Latest Blog Posts

101 Ways to use your Knife: #1 “How to make a Spear”

If you were ever in a true survival scenario, being able to make a spear would not only be useful for hunting or fishing, but a spear is also a useful tool for protection. Being able to make a spear is a simple yet critical survival skill. Below, we will go over some basics to spear making techniques. There are many many ways to do this, some that could take you hours to finish. We are choosing a very simple and quick technique that takes minimal time, energy yet could produce maximum damage in a pinch.)

Note: If you are in a survival scenario and you only have one knife available to you, we recommended that you do not use your knife as the spear point. We recommend using your knife to hone and shape a piece of wood into a spear point. However, there are certain survival circumstances where you would need / want to use your knife as the spear point.

Materials Needed:

1. Solid tree branch or limb
2. Knife
3. Length of cord, cable, twine, leather strap. Anything strong that can we wrapped and tied.

The Steps:

Step 1: Check your surroundings for a piece of wood that would make for a solid spear handle. You are looking for a strong circular branch or limb that will comfortably fit in your hand.

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Step 2: Place the handle of your knife against your spear handle to see how stable it is.

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Step 3: Shave off any imperfections that will interfere with the handle making contact with your spear handle.

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Ideally, you want the knife handle to make as much clean contact as possible with your spear handle.

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Step 4: For this step you will need some sort of twine, cable, leather strap, cord, line, etc.. This is needed to attach your knife to your spear handle. We are going to be using one of our paracord survival bracelets, but just follow along and you will get the idea.

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*Cutting end of bracelet

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*Unravel the paracord bracelet to get a useable length of rope

Step 5: Place the handle of your knife on the prepared end of your spear handle

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Step 6: Begin tightly wrapping the handle of your knife to the spear handle using your rope

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Step 7: Once you feel you have properly secured your knife to the spear handle, tie off the rope. Being that we were doing this for example (and we have short attention spans) we did not completely wrap the handle of the knife with rope. If this was to be used for a real survival scenario we highly recommend wrapping around the entire handle of your knife.

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You now have a hunting tool, fishing tool, and medium range weapon.

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What we used for this demonstration:

1. Nemesis Serrated OTF Knife
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2. Paracord Firestarter Survival Bracelet

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The Importance of Honoring our Veterans…

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In case you didn’t know, today is Veteran’s Day.. Veteran’s Day seems to fall into that class of American holidays that typically includes one of the following activities: hanging with your buddies or family, eating or drinking way too much, catching up on chores or errands, or just plain relaxing and doing nothing. There is absolutely nothing wrong with any of those activities, as long as we don’t forget why we have this day, and who this day honors.

What Exactly is Veteran’s Day?

Veterans Day was originally called “Armistice Day”, and has always been celebrated on Nov. 11. This is to commemorate the first anniversary of the end of World War I which ended Nov. 11, 1919. Congress passed a resolution in 1926 for an annual observance, and Nov. 11 became a national holiday beginning in 1938.

What’s the Difference Between Veteran’s Day and Memorial Day?

Memorial Day (the fourth Monday in May) honors American service members who died in service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle, while Veterans Day pays tribute to all American veterans–living or dead–but especially gives thanks to living veterans who served their country honorably during war or peacetime.

Veteran’s Day Trivia:

  • In 1954, President Eisenhower officially changed the name of the holiday from Armistice Day to Veterans Day.
  • In 1968, the Uniform Holidays Bill was passed by Congress, which moved the celebration of Veterans Day to the fourth Monday in October. The law went into effect in 1971, but in 1975 President Ford returned Veterans Day to November 11, due to the important historical significance of the date.
  • Britain, France, Australia and Canada also commemorate the veterans of World Wars I and II on or near November 11th: Canada has Remembrance Day, while Britain has Remembrance Sunday (the second Sunday of November). In Europe, Britain and the Commonwealth countries it is common to observe two minutes of silence at 11 a.m. every November 11.

What does a Veteran Look Like?

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The classical image of the American veteran seems to be the older man who proudly served his country during one of the “Great” wars. But did you know that veterans come from all different walks of life and in all different ages?

Sometimes veterans are older….

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Sometimes veterans are younger….

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Sometimes veterans are women….

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Sometimes veterans span numerous generations….

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Sometimes veterans are people we ignore on the streets….

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What do ALL Veterans Have in Common? They all have served YOU….

How did Veterans Serve?

First and foremost our veterans protected our country and its’ values. They did this by putting their lives on the line everyday, in foreign countries, against enemies with little or no moral code or regard for human life. They willfully did this whether or not their efforts were appreciated by us or not.

But veterans did so much more than just fight the traditional battles.

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They Provided Aid and Hope:

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They Provided Smiles and Security:

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They Provided Lollipops and a Small Piece of Happiness:

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Why is it Important to Honor our Veterans?

There are so many ways to answer this question, but we will just focus on a few

1. Veterans fought for our freedoms and risked their lives whether or not we realized it or appreciated it.
2. Without the service of veterans we would not have the freedoms we have today.
3. Veterans have served ALL of us.
4. Many veterans struggle to adapt to regular life, get lost in “the system” or become homeless once they get back from their service.

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Three Simple Ways to Honor a Veteran on Veteran’s Day:

Have you ever seen a soldier in uniform and wanted to go say “thank you” or something like that, but just didn’t quite have the nerve? Well problem solved my friends, below are a few simple things you can do to really show a veteran that you appreciate them on Veteran’s Day.

Veteran’s Day is great because so many Veteran’s go out there in their full uniforms, and this will make them really easy to spot. When you see a veteran in uniform please do at least one of the following:

1. The Obvious Play : Go up to the veteran, look them in the eyes, smile wide, shake their hand, and sincerely thank them for their service. This is an extremely cost effective way to let a veteran know how they are appreciated.

2. Buy a Veteran Lunch / Coffee : If you know a veteran invite them out to lunch / coffee; or if you see a vet while you are out and about, go up to that veteran and let them know you would like to pay for their meal / coffee. After that, look them in the eyes, smile wide, shake their hand, and sincerely thank them for their service.

3. Volunteer or Donate to the VA (U.S. Department of Veteran’s Affairs): Click this link for information on how to donate to the VA or how to volunteer in your specific state:  http://www.volunteer.va.gov/apps/VolunteerNow/default.asp

I guarantee you that if you do any of those about three steps, you will have successfully honored a veteran on Veteran’s Day.

The Challenge

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Find a way today to go out of your way to thank a veteran, you really are only called to do this once a year. So go find a veteran and please give them a hug, a handshake or a hamburger. I guarantee you that they will appreciate any gesture from the heart.

At Raven Crest Tactical we are honored to know many men and women who have served this country. Below are two special veterans that we would like to personally honor.

Lance Corporal Tyler Groth:

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Meet Lance Corporal Tyler Groth, brother-in-law of company co-founder Nate Mirand. Tyler served 6 years total in the Marines, 4 years in reserve and 2 in active duty. Tyler is still serving his community daily as an active police officer. Tyler is also a husband and father of 4…..girls. When Tyler’s schedule permits he will travel and run shows for us. If you purchased a knife from us at the F.O.P convention, then you got a chance to meet Tyler. Tyler, thank you for your service to this country.

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US Navy OS3 Operations Specialist Kelly Rae Pisano

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Meet Mrs. Kelly Rae Pisano a very close friend of the Raven Crest family. Her official title is “US Navy OS3 Operations Specialist 3rd Class Petty Officer”. She was the 14th female on board the USS Nimitz and she server our country for 6 years. She is a wife, mother of 3 and small business owner. I know what you are thinking: “where did you guy’s get Demi Moore’s GI Jane’s stunt double?” she gets that a lot. In all serious though, Kelly Rae’s story is awesome, inspiring, and encouraging, but to share it would take almost a whole book. Let’s just say that whenever life hands Kelly Rae lemons she turns them into a filet mignon. Kelly Rae, thank you for your service to this country.

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US Navy David Lane

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Honoring David Lane, father-in-law of company co-founder Derek Jordan.

US Air Force Theodore McWethy

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Honoring Theodore McWethy, grandfather of company co-founder Derek Jordan.

Spartan Facts

Spartan Warrior Trivia

8 Spartan “Did You Know?” Facts :

1. Did you know Spartans had to prove their fitness even as infants?

Infanticide was a disturbingly common act in the ancient world, but in Sparta this practice was organized and managed by the state. All Spartan infants were brought before a council of inspectors and examined for physical defects, and those who weren’t up to standards were left to die. The ancient historian Plutarch claimed these “ill-born” Spartan babies were tossed into a chasm at the foot of Mount Taygetus, but most historians now dismiss this as a myth. If a Spartan baby was judged to be unfit for its future duty as a soldier, it was most likely abandoned on a nearby hillside. Left alone, the child would either die of exposure or be rescued and adopted by strangers. Babies who passed inspection still didn’t have it easy. To test their constitutions, Spartan infants were often bathed in wine instead of water. They were also frequently ignored when they cried and commanded never to fear darkness or solitude. According to Plutarch, these “tough love” parenting techniques were so admired by foreigners that Spartan women were widely sought after for their skill as nurses and nannies.

2. Did you know Spartan children were placed in a military-style education program?

At the age of 7, Spartan boys were removed from their parents’ homes and began the “agoge,” a state-sponsored training regimen designed to mold them into skilled warriors and moral citizens. Separated from their families and housed in communal barracks, the young soldiers-in-waiting were instructed in scholastics, warfare, stealth, hunting and athletics. At age 12, initiates were deprived of all clothing save for a red cloak and forced to sleep outside and make their own beds from reeds. To ready them for a life in the field, the boy soldiers were also encouraged to scavenge and even steal their food, though if detected they were punished with floggings. Just as all Spartan men were expected to be fighters, all women were expected to bear children. Spartan girls were allowed to remain with their parents, but they were also subjected to a rigorous education and training program. While boys were readied for a life on campaign, girls practiced dance, gymnastics and javelin and discus throwing, which were thought to make them physically strong for motherhood.

3. Did you know hazing and fighting were encouraged among Spartan children?

Much of the Spartan agoge involved typical school subjects like reading, writing, rhetoric and poetry, but the training regimen also had a vicious side. To toughen the young warriors and encourage their development as soldiers, instructors and older men would often instigate fights and arguments between trainees. The agoge was partially designed to help make the youths resistant to hardships like cold, hunger and pain, and boys who showed signs of cowardice or timidity were subject to teasing and violence by peers and superiors alike. Even Spartan girls were known to participate in this ritualized hazing. During certain religious and state ceremonies, girls would stand before Spartan dignitaries and sing choral songs about the young men of the agoge, often singling out specific trainees for ridicule in order to shame them into stepping up their performance.

4. Did you know all Spartan men were expected to be lifelong soldiers?

As grueling as Sparta’s martial education system could be, the soldier’s life was the only option for young men who wished to become equal citizens, or “Homoioi.” According to the edicts of the Spartan lawmaker and reformer Lycurgus, male citizens were legally prevented from choosing any occupation other than the military. This commitment could last for decades, as warriors were required to remain on reserve duty until the age of 60. Because of their preoccupation with the study of warfare, Sparta’s manufacturing and agriculture were left entirely to the lower classes. Skilled laborers, traders and craftsmen were part of the “Perioeci,” a class of free non-citizens who lived in the surrounding region of Laconia. Meanwhile, agriculture and food production fell to the enslaved Helots, a servile class that made up the majority of Sparta’s population. Ironically, constant fear of Helot revolts and uprisings was a major reason why the Spartan elite became so devoted to building a strong military in the first place.

5. Did you know Spartan youths were ritualistically beaten and flogged?

One of Sparta’s most brutal practices involved a so-called “contest of endurance” in which adolescents were flogged—sometimes to the death—in front of an altar at the sanctuary of Artemis Orthia. Known as the “diamastigosis,” this annual practice was originally used as both a religious ritual and a test of the boys’ bravery and resistance to pain. It later devolved into an outright blood sport after Sparta went into decline and fell under control of the Roman Empire. By the third century A.D. there was even an amphitheater constructed so that scores of tourists could cheer on the grisly ordeal.

6. Did you know food was intentionally kept scarce, and poor fitness was cause for ridicule?

When a Spartan man completed the main phase of the agoge at around age 21, he was elected to a “syssitia”—a military-style mess where citizens gathered for public meals. To prepare soldiers for the strain of war and discourage poor fitness, the rations doled out at these communal dining halls were always bland and slightly insufficient. Spartans were renowned for their devotion to physical fitness and proper diet, and they reserved a special loathing for overweight citizens, who were publicly ridiculed and risked being banished from the city-state. Wine was a staple of the Spartan diet, but they rarely drank to excess and often cautioned their children against drunkenness. In some cases, they would even force Helot slaves to get wildly inebriated as a way of showing young Spartans the negative effects of alcohol.

7. Did you know Spartan men were not allowed to live with their wives until age 30?

Spartan society didn’t discourage romantic love, but marriage and childrearing were both subject to some peculiar cultural and governmental constraints. The state counseled that men should marry at age 30 and women at 20. Since all men were required to live in a military barracks until 30, couples who married earlier were forced to live separately until the husband completed his active duty military service. The Spartans saw marriage primarily as a means for conceiving new soldiers, and citizens were encouraged to consider the health and fitness of their mate before tying the knot. In fact, husbands who were unable to have children were expected to seek out virile substitutes to impregnate their wives. Likewise, bachelors were seen as neglecting their duty and were often publically mocked and humiliated at religious festivals.

8. Did you know for a Spartan surrender in battle was the ultimate disgrace?

Spartan soldiers were expected to fight without fear and to the last man. Surrender was viewed as the epitome of cowardice, and warriors who voluntarily laid down their arms were so shamed that they often resorted to suicide. According to the ancient historian Herodotus, two Spartan soldiers who missed out on the famous Battle of Thermopylae returned to their homeland disgraced. One later hanged himself, and the other was only redeemed after he died fighting in a later engagement. Even Spartan mothers were known for their do-or-die approach to military campaigns. Spartan women are said to have sent their sons off to war with a chilling reminder: “Return with your shield or on it.” If a Spartan trooper died in battle, he was viewed as having completed his duty as a citizen. In fact, the law mandated that only two classes of people could have their names inscribed on their tombstones: women who died in childbirth and men who fell in combat.

8 Spartan OTF “Did You Know?” Facts:

Spartan OTF Knives by Raven Crest Tactical

1. Did you know every Spartan OTF knife is hand built and quality tested in Mesa, Arizona?

2. Did you know every Spartan OTF knife is hand sharpened by a master sharpener who has been sharpening blades in Arizona for over 30 years?

3. Did you know every Spartan OTF knife had real ebony wood inlays on both sides of the handle? These inlays make for exceptional gripping capabilities.

4. Did you know every Spartan OTF knife has a glass breaker on the end of the handle?

5. Did you know the Spartan OTF knife comes in either Tanto or Spear Point blade?

6. Did you know that every Spartan OTF knife comes with a 100% satisfaction guarantee?

7. Did you know that every Spartan OTF knife comes with a full, lifetime, no questions asked warranty?

8. Did you know that this warranty also covers sharpening for the life of the knife?

Spartan OTF Product Pages:

Spartan OTF Product Page (Tanto Blade)
Spartan “Gladius” OTF Product Page (Spear Point Blade)

 

Resources:

http://www.history.com/news/history-lists/8-reasons-it-wasnt-easy-being-spartan

Spartan Toughness

Spartan Toughness…

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The Spartan army stood at the center of the Spartan state, whose citizens’ primary obligation was to be killing machines. The Spartans were one of the most feared military forces in world history. At the height of Sparta’s power, it was commonly accepted that, “one Spartan was worth several men of any other state.”

The tales of Spartan warriors are filled with pictures of fearless and almost reckless bravery. The story that most of us are familiar with (thanks to the movie 300) is The Battle of Thermopylae. This was a week long battle where a Greek force of approximately 7,000 men marched to block the pass of the Persian army. The ancient sources alleged the Persian army to have numbered over one million, but today it is considered to have been more like 100,000 – 150,000 Persians. Either way, the battle was a few Greeks vs a lot of Persians. And for most of the time the Greeks had the upper hand. What the Greeks accomplished that week has since been celebrated in many different ways.

The vastly outnumbered Greeks held off the Persians for seven days (including three full days of battle) before they were annihilated in one of history’s most famous last stands. During three full days of battle, the small force led by Leonidas blocked the only road by which the massive Persian army could pass. After the second day of battle, a local resident betrayed the Greeks by revealing to the Persians a small path that led behind the Greek lines (if this wouldn’t have happened who know how long the Greeks would have held off the Persians). This betrayal sealed the fate for the Spartans and the remaining Greek forces. What the Spartan King Leonidas did next is what we are going to talk about. King Leonidas, knowing the dire situation that he and his troops were in, dismissed the bulk of the Greek army and remained to guard their retreat with only 300 Spartans, 700 Thespians, 400 Thebans, and perhaps a few hundred others, most of whom were killed. Why did King Leonidas so eagerly go into a battle that he knew would take his life and the lives of his men? The following information may help explain why King Leonidas willingly gave his life that day.

Born for War

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**WARNING: Before we go into the training of the Spartan warrior, we have to warn you that most parts of the Spartan’s training would be considered extremely cruel in our current society. We are not condoning how the Spartans trained their warriors, we are just stating facts.**

Unlike other Greek societies of the time, Spartan men did not have a career choice. All Spartan men were born to be warriors. From birth until the age of 60, a Spartan man’s only focus was war.

As soon as a baby boy was born in Sparta he was taken to the Council of Elders so that they might decide if he should live or die. If the child was strong and healthy he was given back to his parents, if he was weak and ailing he was left alone on a hillside to die from cold and hunger.

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When the boy reached seven years of age, the Spartan boy was taken from his home to a public training-house. Here the strict discipline begins. Shoes and stockings were never worn by the little Spartan warriors, although the hills and countryside were rough for unshod feet. In winter they were clad in one garment, just as in summer. Their beds were made of rushes, which they had themselves gathered from the banks of the river Eurotas. This was a hard task, for they were not allowed to cut them with a knife, but must break them with their hands. In winter the boys used to scatter thistle-down on the rushes to give a little warmth to their hard couch.

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Each child, from the age of seven, cooked his own food, which was scanty and plain. If after their meals the boys were still hungry, that was looked upon as a good thing. It would teach them to hunt the more keenly, that they might add to their daily portion of food. It would teach them to steal from the neighboring farm-yards or gardens without being found out. So a hungry Spartan boy would climb into a garden undiscovered, or even slip into a stranger’s larder in search of fruit and food. If the boys were caught, they were punished, not for stealing, but for being so clumsy as to be caught.

Here is a famous story about the toughness and severe conditions these young warriors had to go through: “Once a Spartan boy stole a young fox and hid it under his coat. It soon began to scratch with its claws, to bite with its teeth, until the lad was in terrible pain, yet he would have died rather than tell what he was suffering. Such was the endurance taught to the young boys of Sparta.”

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If a boy complained of any hardship, or disobeyed any order, he was flogged, perhaps even tortured. One test of his endurance was a terrible scourging, under which he would die rather than utter a cry of pain.

Once the Spartan boys were twenty years old before they left the training-house to which they had been sent when they were seven. They were then fully-trained soldiers and left the training-house for the barracks.

When war actually came and the Spartans were on the field, they were treated with more kindness than in time of peace. Their food was more plentiful and pleasant, their discipline less strict. This was done to make the soldiers look forward to war, and to desire it rather than peace. The Spartans were happier in war than in peace.

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As hard as the Spartan training was, and as cruel as it sometimes became, it made boys into strong and fearless soldiers. Bravery was the ultimate virtue for the Spartans. There are famous stories of Spartan mothers who would give their sons the shield with the words “[Return] With it or [carried] on it!” that is to say, either victorious or dead.

Retreating in battle was not an option for a Spartan soldier, in fact it was worse then death. Their goal was to either win the battle and return with their shield, or they were to give their life fighting in honor, returning dead on their shield. Those were the only two options for the Spartan warrior.

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For a Spartan, to die in battle was a honor like no other. They embraced the challenge of battle and they looked forward to it. Death in battle was romantic to a Spartan warrior. That was their fate from birth, to be a perfect war machine with no fear of death. Maybe this embracing of death was all about honor, but maybe death for a Spartan warrior was the only way they could truly experience peace. Either way, this is why King Leonidas openly accepted his fate, and even looked forward to the glory of death. Because that is what he and his soldiers were born to do.

Spartan Knife Born to Perform

Spartan OTF Knives by Raven Crest Tactical

Just like the young Spartans who were born with a purpose, our Spartan OTF knife is also built with a purpose. That purpose is to perform under any and all circumstances. We hand assemble every Spartan OTF knife, and every Spartan blade is hand sharpened using a 4 step process. These knives will stand up to whatever you throw at them, that is a guarantee; and just like the Spartan warriors, they will embrace the challenges they are put through. These knives have real Ebony wood inlays on both sides of the handle. This makes for extra gripping ability which is critical for hard core thrusting and cutting.

To see our torture test for the Spartan see the video below and remember the just like all our other OTF knives, the Spartan comes with a full, no questions asked, lifetime warranty. So if you do find a way to end the life of your Spartan, we will send you a new one.

Spartan OTF Product Pages:

Spartan OTF Product Page (Tanto Blade)
Spartan “Gladius” OTF Product Page (Spear Point Blade)

 

Resources:
http://www.history.com/news/history-lists/8-reasons-it-wasnt-easy-being-spartan4
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Thermopylae
http://www.mainlesson.com/display.php?author=macgregor&book=greece&story=training
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spartan_army

Spartan Warrior

The Weapons of the “Ideal Warrior”

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Thanks to Hollywood, and Gerard Butler, most of us have a picture of what a Spartan warrior looked like. Maybe they embellished a little, but what they did get right was how serious of a warrior the Spartan was.

4533758733_b0aba6e8b3_zSparta wasn’t like other Greek city-states that were centers of the arts, learning and philosophy. No, Sparta’s culture was plain and simple: war. Male Spartan’s were allowed only one occupation: solider. Indoctrination into this lifestyle began at age 7, when they left their home and entered the Agoge. During this stage of life the warrior children were subjected to continuous and rigorous physical competitions and challenges. They were also taught survival skills.

Those that survived the training were allowed to be “police officers” of the state until the age of 20. Once the Spartan male reached the age of 20 they would become full-time soldiers. They had no other job or task. They would carry that warrior title until the age of 60.

Weapons of the Spartans

Every Spartan warrior was equipped with 5 different weapons, each with different purposes.

The Xiphos:

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The Xiphos was the close quarter weapon used by Spartan Warriors. It was typically their second choice weapon, should they be forced to use it. Traditionally much shorter than a Greek Xiphos the Spartan’s short sword would prove advantageous when in close quarter battle, with easier maneuverability, being able to inflict damage where a longer sword would be much harder to wield.

The Xiphos sported a leaf shaped straight blade, and would traditionally have been made from bronze or iron, due to the leaf shape nature not requiring the strength that comes from stronger metals like steel.

The Kopis:

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The Kopis was an alternative sword used sometimes by the Spartans. The Kopis was a longer curved blade that used to cut and thrust when attacking the opponent, and featured a single edge as opposed to the duel edge of the Xiphos. The Spartans would wield the Kopis one handed, and even though it was widely considered to be a suitable blade for use when on horseback.

The Javelin:

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Another weapon the Spartans would make use of was the Javelin. Used from long range the Javelin is a throwing weapon the Spartans would employ before closing the distance on their foes. Common in the Ancient Greece, the Javelin was quite a short throwing weapon, typically three feet long, and constructed from a wooden handle combined with a bronze tip used to pierce and damage the recipient.

The Dory:

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The Dory was a spear weapon used by the Spartans, the Dory was truly a hefty spear and could be up to 9ft long in length. When used by the Spartans this spear would be used with only one hand, allowing the Spartan to maintain and protect himself with his Apsis shield.

When wielding the Dory to attack the Spartan would mix both upwards and downward strikes at their opponents, with both underarm and overarm use of the Dory producing slightly different results.

The Apsis:

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The Apsis was the shield of the Spartan warriors and much loved. Although one may consider the Apsis a defence weapon, in the hands of the skilled Spartans it could also be an attacking weapon.

The Apsis is a multi material construction, and completely round in shape. The shield would start as multiple layers of wood, with a layer of leather before the outer bronze exterior. The construction of the Apsis allowed the Spartan warrior to withstand most weapons glance, and if needed was a suitably heavy blunt force weapon.

The Raven Crest Tactical Spartan Knife:

Spartan OTF Knives by Raven Crest TacticalWe are proud to announce the release of a new OTF knife we feel is Spartan worthy. The Spartan OTF knife is a very heavy duty knife and was designed to perform under any and all conditions. The handle of the Spartan OTF knife has exotic ebony wood inlays that we source from Indonesia. These inlays are not just for aesthetics, they give maximum gripping capabilities, which is critical for thrusting or penetrating heavy duty materials.

We offer the Spartan OTF knife in two versions, our standard version has a serrated or non serrated tanto blade. We also offer a “Gladius” version of the Spartan OTF which has a spear point blade. This blade is more along the lines of what traditional Roman foot soldiers carried.

No matter which version you choose, we assure you that the Spartan OTF is going to exceed your expectations. We guarantee it. Please click the link below, get one of these knives while they last and find out for yourself how awesome owning a Spartan OTF can be.

The Spartans had a famous saying “Molon labe”, it means “Come and Take Them”. It was made famous because it was used as an expression of defiance. When the Persian army’s demanded that the Greeks surrender their weapons at the Battle of Thermopylae, King Leonidas responded with that phrase. We guarantee that if your get to own a Spartan OTF knife you will adopt that same level of passion for your knife.

Resources:
http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/sparta
http://www.legendsandchronicles.com/ancient-weapons/spartan-weapons/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molon_labe

Why We Love The Tanto Blade

Spirit of the Samurai – Why We Love The Tanto Blade

Who was the Samurai Warrior?

Samurai_Sword_SpinDeadly. Smart. Skilled. Disciplined. Loyal. Precise. Feared. Respected. These are just a few of the ways that history has described the samurai warrior. The mighty samurai is a warrior legend, and for over 200 years stories of the samurai trickled down from generation to generation. The story of the samurai will continue to live on because of how interesting and unique the samurai were. We are going to discuss some interesting characteristics of the samurai, and at the end of this article we will show you how to add a piece of the samurai spirit to your daily life. Before we go any further into the details of a Samurai Warrior, here is a very quick crash course on the Samurai…

Samurai Quick Reference Guide:

1. The term samurai originally meant “those who serve in close attendance to nobility”
2. The samurai were members of a powerful military caste in feudal Japan in the 12th century.
3. Samurai were servants to the most powerful political and social men of the era.
4. As servants of the great lords, the samurai backed up the authority of the shogun and gave him power over the emperor.
5. The samurai loyally protected their masters as well as enforced their orders.
6. The samurai were bound by a code of honor, discipline and morality known as Bushido or “The Way of the Warrior.”
7. If a samurai violated this code of honor (or was captured in battle), a gruesome ritual suicide was the chosen method of punishment and atonement.
8. The ritual suicide of a samurai or Seppuku can be either a voluntary act or a punishment.
9. Either way the ritual suicide of a samurai is generally seen as an extremely honorable way to die.
10. The samurai would dominate Japanese government and society until 1868.

There you have it, you now know just enough about Samurai’s to be dangerous in a conversation.

To sum it up even further, the samurai were highly trained, well equipped elite warriors whose weapons and tactics are still studied today.

What we are going to focus on next in this article is what the samurai warriors would use as their weapons of choice, and why they used them.

The Warrior Spirit

Samurai

Samurai, 1866. Photograph by Felice Beato

Japanese swords are the weapons that have come to be synonymous with the samurai. Samurai believed that their warrior spirit was contained within their swords. The sword was the weapon of choice for the samurai. The samurai sword has evolved over the centuries, starting from a straight blade and moving to a curved blade and then ultimately the katana was chosen.  The samurai also carried smaller companion swords known as the wakizashi and the tanto. Wearing a long sword (katana) or (tachi) together with a smaller sword such as a wakizashi or tanto became the symbol of the samurai, this combination of swords is referred to as a daisho (literally “big and small”).

115-YK58BB4a
*Katana, Wakizashi, and Tanto on display

Samurai Weapons and Tactics Quick Reference

japanese-swords-types1

1. The Samurai were experts in a wide variety of combat skills including hand-to-hand combat, ground fighting, fighting with arms (swords, bows, spears) and fighting from horseback.
2. The elite Samurai warrior trained for many years in the art “Bujutsu.”
3. We are going to focus on the samurai’s weapon of choice, the sword.
4. The samurai’s swords were yet another important aspect of his life
5. Samurai often named their swords, in a dedication of devotion.
6.
Samurai believed that their warrior spirit was contained within their swords.
7. The samurai wore two swords, a wakizashi and a katana.
8.
The samurai’s katana was his primary weapon of self-defense
9. Samurai’s also carried a smaller wakizashi sword.
10.
The samurai often used his wakizashi in close quarter combat situations and even during ceremonial, ritual suicide if the warrior had broken one of the 7 virtues of bushido.
11. When worn with the Japanese katana, the pair (of katana and wakizashi) is then referred to as daisho.
12.
Their swords were made by master sword smiths and quality tested on the corpses of criminals.
13. The forging of a genuine Samurai sword is a tedious, labor-intensive process that begins with a specialized Japanese steel called “tamahagane.” Through this smelting process, a steel is produced that consists of a carbon count that is balanced throughout the steel making it the optimal steel for fashioning a sword. Master Swordsmiths then begin the process of folding the steel begins and can be folded up to 16 times. This process helps to remove any remaining impurities, while also creating alternating layers that greatly increase the toughness and durability of the blade.

14. The length of a Samurai sword has varied over time, but the modern version is typically around 40 inches overall with a 28 inch blade.

Japanese Sword Making

The Edge of Choice for the Samurai

We have now spent some time learning about who the samurai were, and also what kind of weapons they carried. We know that the samurai were a serious group of warriors who were highly skilled in weapons and tactics. We also know that they had a deep, almost spiritual, bond with their swords. We learned that making a samurai sword is an extremely labor intensive job that takes the hands of a master swordsmith. Knowing how serious the bond with their swords went, and also knowing what they used their swords for, one could suggest that the samurai would have wanted to possess the best, most capable sword available to them. For the most part, the samurai chose the tanto style blade as their blade of choice for their weapons. This was not a coincidence, this was a thought out strategic choice.

Body Armour of the Time

q1pL.St.117

Japanese samurai armor was typically made up of many small parts and a wide variety of materials. Steel, leather, and wood typically form the protective plating, which may be composed of many small sections laced together using leather or silk cord. Samurai armor was designed to be strong, protective, flexible and terrifying.

Being that the body armor being warn was very heavy duty, the samurai needed a weapon that would excel at piercing through tough materials. The tanto blade was the desired choice for Japanese long and short swords.

Characteristics of the Tanto Blade:

SamuraiTanto

The tanto blade has a high point with a flat grind, leading to an extremely strong point that is perfect for stabbing into hard materials. The thick point of the tanto blade contains a lot of metal near the tip, so it is able to absorb the impact from repeated piercing that would cause most other knives to break.

The front edge of the tanto blade meets the back edge at an angle, rather than a curve. As a result, the tanto blade does not have a belly, which is sacrificed in exchange for a stronger tip. However, it’s extremely strong point allows it to be used in tough situations where piercing hard materials is required.

Japanese-swords-samurai-swords-tanto-cold-steel
Japanese Tanto Knife

The Japanese tanto is a Japanese dagger carried by samurai. Specifically, the Japanese tanto is one with a guard that has all of the fittings used on swords. The Japanese tanto blade rarely exceeds 12 inches in length and usually accompanying a katana. The tanto is much more decorated and has unusual fittings than the larger swords. The Japanese tanto was designed primarily as a stabbing instrument, but the edge can be used to slash as well.

Become One with the Samurai…

1000x1000_B_Knife8

If the OTF knife existed back in days of the samurai, I would like to believe that they would have wanted to incorporate it into their war arsenal. Unfortunately that is something we will never actually know. What we do know is that the samurai preferred the tanto blade, and we at Raven Crest Tactical also favor the tanto blade as our preferred blade style. Here is why..

To be 100% honest, part of our love for the tanto is based on the aesthetic beauty of the tanto blade. The sharp curves and beveled edges give the blade a sleek, strong and aggressive look.

RCTTantoNonSerr
Raven Crsst Tactical Non Serrated Tanto Blade

RCTTantoSerr
Raven Crest Tactical Serrated Tanto Blade

Don’t get us wrong, the tanto blade isn’t just a blade for the eyes. The tanto blade is extremely useful for cutting or penetrating tough materials, just ask the samurai. For our OTF knives we offer two variations on the tanto blade, serrated and non serrated. We could go on for days on which is the better option (serrated vs non-serrated), but that ultimately is decided by one’s personal preference.

Now, our OTF knives may not be forged in the fires by an ancient and wise knifesmith, nor is our knives sharpness tested on the corpses of dead criminals; but every one of our knives is hand assembled and hand sharpened using both modern and traditional tools and techniques. These key features not only place our OTF knives up with other elite knife makers, but it follows the traditional ways in which a samurai’s sword was made.

The fact of the matter is this, no matter which style of tanto blade you choose when you carry a Raven Crest Tactical tanto you are carrying with you a piece of the samurai warrior spirit.

Silent_samurai_mask

There is no way we could have written this article without a lot of help.. We thank all those who help contribute to this article.

References:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WkWNDDrQO4#t=1347
http://listverse.com/2013/08/06/10-fascinating-facts-about-the-samurai/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samurai
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tant%C5%8D
http://www.trueswords.com/samurai_history.php
http://getasword.com/blog/125-japanese-sword-types-katana-tachi-wakizashi-nodachi/
https://yokaihigh.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/japanese_weapons-wide.jpg

Happy Halloween To Our Awesome Customers & Fans! We Made You All A “Cheesy” Short Halloween Film…

Happy Halloween from Raven Crest Tactical! Instead of just doing a simple Facebook post this year we decided to try our hand at making a “cheesy” Halloween short film. We did this with VERY LIMITED equipment but had a great time making this for you all. We hope you enjoy! Have a safe, fun and memorable Halloween.


Movie Synopsis:
A college couple decides to have a date night at home just hanging out watching a movie and having popcorn. As they get settled in things start to go bump in the night by the hand of a “psycho” who likes to play games. Our college sweethearts try to track down the source of this craziness but are always one step behind. They soon make the mistake of assuming it was “just nothing” and are soon corrected. In the end the Raven Crest Tactical Nemesis OTF Knife was all that was needed to stop the madness.

Filmed in the style of Blair witch project and other blurry shaky type movies. 😉

OTF Knife Care and Maintenance : Taking Apart and Cleaning your OTF Knife

Cleaning and caring for your OTF knife is a very important part of owning one. A clean and well maintained OTF is a functional and useful tool. A dirty OTF knife can misfire and be unreliable. The good news is that cleaning and caring for an OTF can be very easy and fun. Now, before we go any further we must put this little disclaimer out there:

“We understand that OTF knives come in all different shapes and sizes. So, when discussing the caring for and cleaning of your OTF we are going to assume that you own one of our fantastic knives.”

If you don’t own one of our OTF knives then I would really recommend getting one.. They are awesome and we guarantee your satisfaction…

But seriously if you own another brand I highly recommend reading their warranty details to make sure that opening up your knife doesn’t void the warranty. Now, if you are allowed to open up your knife without voiding the warranty I recommend going to YouTube and doing a search for “cleaning and caring for a (“enter your knife name here”)”. Chances are someone out there made a video showing you how to properly clean your knife. If you do own a knife that has a stipulation against opening it, I recommend contacting that manufacturer to find out how they recommend caring for their product.

BASIC STEPS TO CARING FOR YOUR OTF KNIFE:

1. Discharge your Knife: This step was not in our video, but we highly recommend performing this step before opening up your knife. To discharge your knife simply fire it at close range against something that is not human, animal, or valuable. We recommend a phone book or even a piece of paper will do the job. Once fired at close range, the blade should discharge from it’s mechanism and slide freely in and out of the handle. If the knife has been properly discharged, the trigger will not eject or retract the blade.

2. Prepare your Tools: To properly open and clean your OTF knife you are going to need a few items. First, you will need a 2 mm metric or 5/64th standard bit. Then you will also need a light lubricant and a rag.

3. Open the Knife: Use your desired bit to unscrew the 6 screws that hold the handle together.

4. Remove the Inside Components: Once the screws are removed, it is time to disassemble the knife and separate the individual components. The main internal components are the slider, the main spring, and the blade. For this step just worry about getting the handle separated as well as separating the spring and slider so that they can be cleaned.

5. Remove the Blade: The easiest way to explain this is to watch the video attached to this post.

6. Clean all Parts: We have tried many different kinds of light lubricants, and the one that seems to work out the best for us is the WD-40 rust proof spray as seen in our video. If you have a light lubricant that you would prefer please feel free to use it. If the lubricant is too thick it is going to restrict the blade path and keep the knife from firing properly. If this is the case simply re-clean all components and either use no lubricant, or try a different type of lubricant that will not restrict the blade path. And if that still doesn’t work, give us a call and we will get your knife back to working order.

7. Reassemble and Enjoy your OTF: Go there and hunt bears, cut cheese, save damsels in distress or whatever it is that you use your Ravencrest Tactical OTF Knife for. Just do it safely and in good health!

We hope that this article has been useful (and hopefully somewhat amusing). If it has been, we ask you to please share it somewhere.

Next week we are going to go over how to properly sharpen and maintain the edge of your blade. Stay tuned….

OTF Knife State Laws and Legalities

OTF Knife State Laws:

MYTH: Switchblades / OTF Knives and Balisongs (butterfly knives) are illegal everywhere without exception

Not true. Most laws about non-firearm weapons are by state, with very few existing at the Federal level. Currently, the only country-wide law about switchblades is US Code Title 15, Chapter 29, and this law only controls the importation of these knives into the US, and the sale over state lines. It has no effects on buying, owning or carrying switchblades. Such is left to the states. The majority of states allow legal ownership of switchblades, but a few do not. Many have prohibitions on the sale of them, and most have laws against carrying them concealed. But some states such as Vermont and Utah have no restrictions on them.

 US Switchblade / OTF Knife Laws

The following is a comprehensive compilation of the laws on switchblades (also called automatics or OTF Knives) in the United States. This chart covers both overall federal law and each state law. These laws are for non-law enforcement citizens, as nearly all laws contain some sort of exemption for police. In states where unlawful intent must be proven (and is not simply presumed) for the knife to be illegal, this chart counts this as “legal.”

Legend:

Possession = Refers to the legality of merely owning or having direct control over a switchblade, even if kept at home. Sale = The legality of merchants and private citizens offering switchblades for sale or selling them. Usually includes any transfer of ownership, even gifts. Note that such laws almost always only affect the seller; no state law affects the buyer of such a transaction. Open Carry = legality of carrying a switchblade unconcealed and in plain view of others. Concealed Carry = legality of carrying a switchblade in a concealed manner on one’s person(or most of the time, in a car). Balisong considered same thing? = Refers to if the wording of the law considers switchblades and balisongs to be the same thing. If “Yes,” balisongs are subject to all the same restrictions as switchblades listed for that state. If “no” they are covered by a separate law and may or may not be legal. Blanks indicate the state has no laws about either.

Practical Matters

If possession itself is illegal, then all others become illegal by default. If possession is legal, but sale is not, it effectively becomes impossible to legally obtain a switchblade from within that state (since federal law prohibits inter-state sale). One must physically travel to another state to legally purchase.

OTF_Knife_Legal_States_Map_2015

State

Possession

Sale

Open Carry

Concealed Carry

Balisong considered same thing?

US Federal Law

Legal

Illegal when sold over state lines or imported from outside the US

Legal

Legal

Yes

Alabama

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Alaska

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Arizona

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if over 21 years old

Arkansas

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

California

Legal

Legal if blade is <2″

Legal if blade is <2″

Legal if blade is <2″

Yes

Colorado

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Connecticut

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤1.5″

Legal if blade is ≤1.5″

No

Delaware

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

District of Columbia

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Florida

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal (Legal with gun permit)

N/A

Georgia

Legal

Legal (if over 18)

Legal if blade is ≤5″ (any length with gun permit)

Legal if blade is ≤5″ (any length with gun permit)

Hawaii

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Idaho

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤4″

No

Illinois

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Indiana

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

Iowa

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤5″

No

Kansas

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Kentucky

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Louisiana

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Maine

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

Maryland

Legal

Illegal

Legal

Illegal

No

Massachusetts

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Michigan

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Minnesota

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Mississippi

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

Missouri

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Yes

Montana

Illegal (ex. Curio or blade is ≤1.5″)

Illegal (ex. Curio or blade is ≤1.5″)

Illegal

Illegal

No

Nebraska

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤3.5″

Nevada

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

New Hampshire

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

New Jersey

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

New Mexico

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

New York

Illegal*

Illegal*

Illegal*

Illegal*

No

North Carolina

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

North Dakota

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Ohio

Legal

Illegal

Legal

Illegal

No

Oklahoma

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

Oregon

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Yes

Pennsylvania

Illegal (ex. Curio)

Illegal (ex. Curio)

Illegal

Illegal

No

Rhode Island

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤3″

No

South Carolina

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

South Dakota

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Tennessee

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

Texas

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is <5.5″

Legal if blade is <5.5″

Yes

Utah

Legal

Legal

Legal

Situational

Yes

Vermont

Legal

Legal if blade is <3″

Legal

Legal

No

Virginia

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Washington

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

West Virginia

Legal (if over 18)

Legal

Legal (if over 18)

Illegal

No

Wisconsin

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

Wyoming

Legal

Legal

Legal

Situational

*New York’s state law provides an exception for “Possession of a switchblade or gravity knife for use while hunting, trapping or fishing by a person carrying a valid license.” Whether this affects sale or type of carry is unclear.

**Information cited from: “http://weaponlaws.wikidot.com/us-switchblade-laws”

OTF Knife Buyers Guide

The Best OTF Knife Is The One That’s In Your Pocket

There is no magic formula when it comes to making a decision about purchasing a OTF knife. There are so many OTF knives on the market today. Many are great products from trusted companies. So how do you know whats right for you? There are a couple of principles we here at Raven Crest Tactical believe you should follow when picking out your next trusted OTF knife..

What Will You Be Using Your OTF Knife For?

When it comes to picking out any new OTF knife you need to think about the purpose for which you intend to use the OTF knife. Will it be something to add to the collection or will it remain in the glove box of your car in case of emergencies? Will it ride along in your tool box at work or in your hunting bag? Will it be used for self defense or a utility blade for every day tasks? You must first understand its function before you can decide on which knife is the right knife for you. Once you have a good idea how you will be using the OTF knife, you can move onto the style of the OTF knife.

Blade Sizes

Blade size considerations

Though usually a matter of personal preference, blade size should be determined by the job for which it is intended and the way you plan to carry your knife. Typically, larger blades are used for outdoor and other heavy-duty applications, while smaller blades are appropriate for everyday tasks. Note: Prior to purchasing a knife, it is a good practice to check the laws in your state or country regarding legal blade sizes and lengths.

Edge Types

Straight

Titan Bravo Tactical OTF Knife Straight Blade

Titan Bravo Tactical OTF Knife Straight Blade

Straight Edge blades are the standard for general knives and cutlery. The ideal choice for hunting, the Straight Edge provides an edge that cuts cleanly and sharpens quickly and easily.

Fully Serrated

Fully Serrated Blade

Fully Serrated Blade

Fully Serrated blades remarkably outperform straight edges when cutting fibrous material, like rope. It is an aggressive edge and often leaves a ragged cut. Serrations typically will stay sharp longer than a straight edge but once dull, are much more difficult to sharpen. However, there are many systems today that make sharpening serrations easier.

Partially Serrated

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Partially Serrated Blade

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Partially Serrated Blade

Partially Serrated blades offer the advantages of both straight and serrated edges in one knife blade. A partially serrated edge is a good compromise when the blade will be used for general purposes.

Blade Shapes

Tanto

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Tanto Blade

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Tanto Blade

Tanto has become identifiable for its angular shape, using two straight edges that are joined. The Tanto tip is very strong due to the spine keeping its full width until it nears the tip, which then tapers to create the point. The Raven Crest Tactical Nemesis OTF Knife is an example of a Tanto blade.

Drop Point

Titan Tactical OTF Knife with Drop Point Blade

Titan Tactical OTF Knife with Drop Point Blade

Drop Point is a pattern used on many knives, commonly seen on hunting blades. The tip is lowered (dropped) via a convex arc from the spine to allow the tip to be ground thicker. This convex shape differentiates it from the clip point. The Raven Crest Tactical Titan Bravo is a good example of this style.

Clip Point

Jackal Tactical OTF Knife with Clip Point Blade

Jackal Tactical OTF Knife with Clip Point Blade

Clip Point is a great all-around format and one of the most popular, used on most bowie knives. The blade shape uses a concave or straight cutout toward the tip. The Raven Crest Tactical Jackal Alpha is a fine example of a clip point.

Spear Point

Zombie Hunter Tactical OTF Knife with Spear Point Blade

Zombie Hunter Tactical OTF Knife with Spear Point Blade

Spear Point is a symmetrical grind with the tip located at the blade’s center. Double-edged, the spear point shape makes for a great dagger. The Raven Crest Tactical Venom Bravo is an example of a spear point blade style.

Steel Properties

There is a saying: The heart of a knife is its steel. While steel certainly is very important, it is not the only factor in determining the performance of a knife (other considerations being heat treatment and blade shape/profile). The level of steel quality varies greatly from knife to knife. Most modern knives, however, are made using stainless steel (a steel alloy with a minimum of 11% chromium content by mass). By varying the amount of chromium and carbon in the makeup of the steel, different properties are achieved.

Some basic information on steel grades and characteristics:

Good

These entry-level, rust-resistant stainless steels are typically made in Asia and offer good value. Compared to higher grades, they tend to be softer and require more frequent sharpening to maintain the best performance, but do adequately hold an edge. EXAMPLES: 420, 440A, 7CR13MOV

Better

Better grade stainless steels contain higher chromium content, making them more expensive. With greater edge holding ability, these steels require less maintenance than entry-level grades of steel. Sharpening is also relatively easy and can be performed using appropriate techniques. A great combination of value and performance, knives made of these steels are perfect for everyday use. EXAMPLES: AUS6, AUS8, 440C, 8CR13MOV

Best

Typically made in the USA and Japan, the best stainless steels come with a cost premium, due to their high chromium content. Additional elements, such as vanadium, are often added to provide superior edge sharpness and retention, as well as enhanced rust resistance. These steels are ideal for more demanding uses. EXAMPLES: CPM 154, S30V, VG-10

AUS-8 and AUS-6 are high-grade chromium Japanese steels that boast a good balance of toughness and strength, edge holding ability, corrosion resistance, and cost. Typical Rockwell hardness is 56-58.

440A and 440C are high-grade cutlery steels that are very similar to AUS above. The 440A contains the least amount of carbon and is more stain-resistant than 440C, which contains the most carbon and is typically harder. Many knives are made of 440 stainless, due to its toughness and relatively low cost.

VG-10 is a well-known, high-end Japanese steel, and is considered premium. It contains vanadium, which is renown for its toughness. The steel is specially designed for high-quality blades used in cutlery. VG-10 can be sharpened to a fine edge that is very durable and can maintain a hardness of Rc 60 without becoming brittle.

CPM S30V is a powder-made stainless steel developed by Crucible Materials Corporation for its wear and corrosion resistance. Considered to be one of the superior steels ever made, its chemistry promotes the formation and even distribution of vanadium carbides, which are harder and more effective at cutting than chromium carbides. In addition, vanadium carbides give the steel a very refined grain, which further contributes to the sharpness and toughness of its edge.

154CM is an American-made premium grade stainless steel, originally developed for tough industrial applications. It combines three principal elements: carbon, chromium, and molybdenum. Known for its best all-around qualities, it offers great corrosion resistance with good toughness and edge quality. Typical Rockwell hardness is 57-59.

D2 is a high-performance tool steel alloy commonly used in knives and tools. It is not considered stainless steel, as its chromium content is one percent less than the required classification.

8Cr13MoV is a Chinese stainless steel with a high performance-to-cost ratio, often compared to AUS-8. Tempered around the Rc56 to Rc58 range.