New Build Your Own Custom MINIs & New Custom Colors!

We’ve Got Some Very Exciting News!
NEW Custom Minis. NEW Colors. New Colored Parts.
We are pumped to finally bring you the highly anticipated Custom Mini Nemesis OTF Knife. You can now Build Your Own Custom Mini Nemesis. With it’s launch we have released 5 NEW Mini Nemesis Handle Colors and 8 NEW Part Colors!

WATCH THE VIDEO TO LEARN MORE:

NEW Handle Colors:
Metallic Gold
Radioactive Blue
Slasher Yellow
Digital Camo
Maroon

NEW Part Colors (Button, Glass Breaker, Pocket Clip):
Bronze
Metallic Gold
Radioactive Blue
Maroon
Slasher Yellow
Pink
Red
Slime Green

With the release of the Custom Minis we have also added to our Full Size Nemesis Custom Line.
NEW Handle Colors:

Metallic Gold
Radioactive Blue
Slasher Yellow
Maroon

NEW Part Colors (Button, Glass Breaker, Pocket Clip):
Bronze
Metallic Gold
Radioactive Blue
Maroon
Slasher Yellow
Pink
Red
Slime Green

DID YOU KNOW?
A lot of our NEW Colors were superhero inspired. We looked to ironman, spider man and wolverine just to name a few. Superheros have inspired and intrigued us since the first story was ever told. We hope you find yourself inspired by these NEW colors to create a legend all your own.

Top 5 “Peoples Choice” Christmas Gifts From Raven Crest Tactical 2014….

Looking through our website you can see that we like to offer a wide variety of OTF knives. We are the only OTF knife company that allows you custom build your own OTF knife from top to bottom. We are constantly trying to offer exciting and new designs, colors and finishes. This is part of what separates us from the rest.

All that being said, we know that some of your are “skimmers” and want a Cliff’s Notes version of our product line, so that you can quickly get that special someone that special gift they will never forget.

Look no further, this article is going to go over our Top 5 OTF knives decided by you our customers. This list is based on actual sales, so the #1 knife is the #1 knife that we sell, not the knife we think is #1.

Before we get into which OTF knives are our top sellers, let’s discuss why you should purchase a Raven Crest Tactical OTF knife as a gift.

Top 3 Reasons to Give a RCT OTF as a Gift:

1. A Rare Gift Guaranteed to Impress:

A Raven Crest Tactical OTF knife is not like any other knife that you can find at the big chain stores. Why is that important? Because if you are looking for a special gift that will surprise and impress, then you want that gift to be something that can’t be easily found at your local big box store’s sporting goods section. You would want to find that gift that no one has ever even seen or heard of before. You would want the gift that makes people wonder how you even found out about it. Look no further, that gift is one of our OTF knives.

Now, let me ask you this: Have you ever bought what you thought was the perfect gift but then found out you either paid too much, the person you bought the gift for wasn’t as impressed as you thought they would be, or you didn’t get all you could have for your money? Yep us too, that feeling stinks. But, be assured none of that will not happen with us.

First, most people have never even seen or held one of our OTF knives. So when someone puts one of our OTF knives in their hands for the first time, they get an almost adolescent level of excitement. That is just how well built our OTF knives are, all it takes is putting one in your hand and we guarantee you that you will be impressed. We have seen this effect in men and women of all ages.

Secondly, you don’t have to worry about not getting the right gift, every one of our knives is guaranteed to be the right gift. Our knives come with a 100% satisfaction guarantee. If you aren’t completely blown away by what you receive from us we will refund or replace your purchase.

2. Quality:

Every Raven Crest Tactical OTF knife is made out of high quality materials and is built to be tank tough. Every one of our OTF knives are hand built, quality tested, and hand sharpened in Gilbert, Arizona. We have put these knives through numerous extreme torture tests that prove just how strong and reliable they are. When you pick up and feel one of our knives, you will instantly know that it is a serious tool and not a toy.

3. Warranty and Pricing:

Fact: We have hands down the BEST warranty in the OTF knife market, yet we price our knives much lower than our competition.

Our warranty is a lifetime, no questions asked, full coverage warranty that will cover anything and everything on and in the the knife (except of theft) for the life of the knife. It doesn’t matter what you do to it, or how you do it, we will either fix it or replace it. Forever. No fine print. No questions asked. Guaranteed.

Fact: When you buy one of our OTF knives, you are getting one of the highest quality OTF knives on the market, with the best warranty available on the market, at a price that cannot be matched.

With a Raven Crest Tactical OTF knife you can buy with 100% confidence.

The Top 5 OTF Knives:

#1 – Build Your Own Custom Knife (Click Image to Purchase)

RCT_BuildYourOwn

#2 – Full Size Nemesis Serrated Black (Click Image to Purchase)

Raven Crest Tactical Nemesis OTF Knife

#3 – Mini Nemesis Series (Click Images to Purchase)

RCT_MiniPinkRCT_MiniBlack

RCT_MiniGreenRCT_MiniReaper

#4 – Spartan (Click Image to Purchase)

RCT_Spartan

#5 Titan Bravo Serrated (Click Image to Purchase)

RCT_Titan

Torture Tests “Behind the Scenes”…

If you have been following us, you have probably noticed that we like to put our OTF knives through “Torture Tests”. For the most part, the torture tests we put our knives through are far more extreme than anything the average person is going to do to their knife. These tests were designed to show how our OTF knives will perform when put through extreme conditions.

We get quite a bit of email / feedback about these videos, sometimes the feedback is that they don’t believe we actually did these tests. They are certain that we did some sort of camera magic to make these look legit. Now these people aren’t meaning to imply that we lie about our tests, they just don’t believe that our OTF knives are strong enough to perform these tests. They are expecting that our OTF knives were designed for novelty or not for actual use.

Fact: Every Raven Crest Tactical OTF knife was built and designed for hard, everyday use.

Video 1 Stabbing a Washing Machine :

This was our first time torture testing our knives, so for this set of torture tests we went out to a metal scrap yard and just started stabbing stuff. Note, we did not bring 20 knives with us for this shoot. We brought 4 knives total. Two were used in filming, one we lost within the first 10 mins because we were trying to throw it into a piece of metal and it got lost in the pile of scrap, and the other one be brought back with us unused.

The first thing we went to was this old washing machine. This was not metal that was giving in easy to our stabbing, it was thick and sturdy. We had to put our full force into each stab to get maximum penetration. Sure enough, as we got more comfortable the stabs got deeper. We used the same knife for the entire filming of this segment.

Video 2 Stabbing a Water Heater :

For this video we attacked a water heater. Now I am not sure if you are familiar with how strong a water heater is, but let me tell you this, this water heater test was the most difficult test to date. I would suggest you go our into your garage and just tap your finger against your water heater to see just how thick that metal is. It is solid and does not want to budge. As you can see in this video co-owner Nate Mirand used his 250 lbs of body weight to penetrate the steel of this water heater. The knife used for this test was the same knife used for the washer test.

Video 3 Cutting Through Metal :

Next we set to cut through a metal door that we saw laying on the ground. Once again, we are using the same knife that we used in the Washer Test and the Water Heater Test. This test was a little awkward because it was hard to get leverage on that door. Even so, the knife sliced through that metal with no problem.

Videos #4 Breaking Glass :

The last part of this day was finding some glass to test out our ball bearing glass breaker. Our ball bearing glass breaker is designed to smash through even tempered glass. Now we were very excited to get this opportunity to head to a scrap yard and destroy some stuff. So excited, that we did not bring gloves. You will see that the reason why the glass doesn’t break on the first strike is because we are purposefully not following through on our strike. Following through would have most definitely broken all that glass on first strike, but it would have also been extremely dangerous to do without gloves. If you do not have gloves, and you need to break glass, it is ok to take a few careful strikes until you get the correct power to break the glass.

As you can see from these videos, it doesn’t take much force for the breaker to break glass. You will also see that there are 3 different pieces of glass, here is what was happening with those pieces.

Glass Piece #1 : This was just a simple, single pain piece of glass. Our breaker went through this like butter.

Glass Piece #2: This was a more heavy duty piece of glass. This honestly felt more like auto glass than just simple fragile glass. It took 2 strikes to break this, but again that was due to us protecting our hands.

Glass Piece #3: This was the most heavy duty piece of glass we could find at this yard. It was very resistant to small strikes. When we tapped this glass like we did with glass piece #1, our knife bounced off instead of breaking the glass. We knew we would need to really put force behind our strike to get this to break. For this test we also show how to “score” glass which in turn will make it easier to break the glass out when struck. Scoring glass works best on large, tempered pieces of glass. Basically all you are doing is scratching an “X” into the glass, which creates a weak point in the middle. Once you have that “X”, aim your strike for the middle of the “X”. We didn’t have to do this for this test to succeed, we just wanted to show the technique.

Glass Breaking Fail : Hammer vs. Car Glass

Here is a very funny video that will show what will happen to heavy duty glass if you do not score it correctly, or have the correct tool. Most people do not know just how difficult auto glass is to break. This reporter learned the hard way and probably had to have some stitches because of it.

Video #5 Hanging Weights on Fully Extended Knife Blade :

This test was done on a different day than the scrap yard day. This knife isn’t a new knife, it was one that was being used as a utility knife for our warehouse manager Steve.

We did this test because we get asked a lot how much weight it takes to make our blade snap at it’s weak point. We know the answer is “a lot”, but we don’t have the actual #. We only had 80 lbs of weight available to us that day, and our blade handled it with no issues. 80 lbs may not seem like a lot, but when you are at the gym next time go pick up an 80 lb dumbbell and see what it feels like in your hand. I am confident that our blade could have held much more weight.

Video #6 Cutting a Work Boot in Half :

These next set of tests were done on a different day and with a different set of knives. These next tests highlight the extreme sharpness of our knives. For this test we started with a brand new freshly sharpened knife. Not too much explanation needed for this video, we stabbed a shoe and cut it in half.

Video #7 Slicing 2 Liter Bottles :

These last 2 videos were done on the same day as the boot cut video. We are using the same knife in these videos as we did for the boot cut. You can see just how effortlessly our knives slice through these bottles. For every strike it felt like we completely missed our target because we didn’t even feel the contact. Then we examined the bottle and saw it sliced apart.

Final Thoughts :

What makes us different than ANY other OTF knife company is that even if you did take a Raven Crest Tactical OTF knife out to a scrap yard and beat the life out of it past the point of proper functioning, we would fix or replace that knife for free. We wouldn’t get mad at you for using it, or blame you for damaging it. We would simply replace or repair it, no questions asked. We make our OTF knives for use and our warranty backs that up 100%.

We put our OTF knives through these extreme tests to show that they are real tools not toys. Do we recommend you go out there and doing what we do? No, we don’t; not because we don’t think our knives will perform, but we just don’t want people getting hurt. Please do not attempt any of these tests unless it is a matter of life or death. Our knives are scarey sharp and one wrong move can easily give you some stitches or maybe worse.

Knife Used in Videos :

Nemesis Serrated OTF Knife

NemesisSerrated

Spartan Warrior

The Weapons of the “Ideal Warrior”

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Thanks to Hollywood, and Gerard Butler, most of us have a picture of what a Spartan warrior looked like. Maybe they embellished a little, but what they did get right was how serious of a warrior the Spartan was.

4533758733_b0aba6e8b3_zSparta wasn’t like other Greek city-states that were centers of the arts, learning and philosophy. No, Sparta’s culture was plain and simple: war. Male Spartan’s were allowed only one occupation: solider. Indoctrination into this lifestyle began at age 7, when they left their home and entered the Agoge. During this stage of life the warrior children were subjected to continuous and rigorous physical competitions and challenges. They were also taught survival skills.

Those that survived the training were allowed to be “police officers” of the state until the age of 20. Once the Spartan male reached the age of 20 they would become full-time soldiers. They had no other job or task. They would carry that warrior title until the age of 60.

Weapons of the Spartans

Every Spartan warrior was equipped with 5 different weapons, each with different purposes.

The Xiphos:

xiphos

The Xiphos was the close quarter weapon used by Spartan Warriors. It was typically their second choice weapon, should they be forced to use it. Traditionally much shorter than a Greek Xiphos the Spartan’s short sword would prove advantageous when in close quarter battle, with easier maneuverability, being able to inflict damage where a longer sword would be much harder to wield.

The Xiphos sported a leaf shaped straight blade, and would traditionally have been made from bronze or iron, due to the leaf shape nature not requiring the strength that comes from stronger metals like steel.

The Kopis:

Kopis

The Kopis was an alternative sword used sometimes by the Spartans. The Kopis was a longer curved blade that used to cut and thrust when attacking the opponent, and featured a single edge as opposed to the duel edge of the Xiphos. The Spartans would wield the Kopis one handed, and even though it was widely considered to be a suitable blade for use when on horseback.

The Javelin:

Javelin

Another weapon the Spartans would make use of was the Javelin. Used from long range the Javelin is a throwing weapon the Spartans would employ before closing the distance on their foes. Common in the Ancient Greece, the Javelin was quite a short throwing weapon, typically three feet long, and constructed from a wooden handle combined with a bronze tip used to pierce and damage the recipient.

The Dory:

Dory

The Dory was a spear weapon used by the Spartans, the Dory was truly a hefty spear and could be up to 9ft long in length. When used by the Spartans this spear would be used with only one hand, allowing the Spartan to maintain and protect himself with his Apsis shield.

When wielding the Dory to attack the Spartan would mix both upwards and downward strikes at their opponents, with both underarm and overarm use of the Dory producing slightly different results.

The Apsis:

Apsis

The Apsis was the shield of the Spartan warriors and much loved. Although one may consider the Apsis a defence weapon, in the hands of the skilled Spartans it could also be an attacking weapon.

The Apsis is a multi material construction, and completely round in shape. The shield would start as multiple layers of wood, with a layer of leather before the outer bronze exterior. The construction of the Apsis allowed the Spartan warrior to withstand most weapons glance, and if needed was a suitably heavy blunt force weapon.

The Raven Crest Tactical Spartan Knife:

Spartan OTF Knives by Raven Crest TacticalWe are proud to announce the release of a new OTF knife we feel is Spartan worthy. The Spartan OTF knife is a very heavy duty knife and was designed to perform under any and all conditions. The handle of the Spartan OTF knife has exotic ebony wood inlays that we source from Indonesia. These inlays are not just for aesthetics, they give maximum gripping capabilities, which is critical for thrusting or penetrating heavy duty materials.

We offer the Spartan OTF knife in two versions, our standard version has a serrated or non serrated tanto blade. We also offer a “Gladius” version of the Spartan OTF which has a spear point blade. This blade is more along the lines of what traditional Roman foot soldiers carried.

No matter which version you choose, we assure you that the Spartan OTF is going to exceed your expectations. We guarantee it. Please click the link below, get one of these knives while they last and find out for yourself how awesome owning a Spartan OTF can be.

The Spartans had a famous saying “Molon labe”, it means “Come and Take Them”. It was made famous because it was used as an expression of defiance. When the Persian army’s demanded that the Greeks surrender their weapons at the Battle of Thermopylae, King Leonidas responded with that phrase. We guarantee that if your get to own a Spartan OTF knife you will adopt that same level of passion for your knife.

Resources:
http://www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/sparta
http://www.legendsandchronicles.com/ancient-weapons/spartan-weapons/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molon_labe

Why We Love The Tanto Blade

Spirit of the Samurai – Why We Love The Tanto Blade

Who was the Samurai Warrior?

Samurai_Sword_SpinDeadly. Smart. Skilled. Disciplined. Loyal. Precise. Feared. Respected. These are just a few of the ways that history has described the samurai warrior. The mighty samurai is a warrior legend, and for over 200 years stories of the samurai trickled down from generation to generation. The story of the samurai will continue to live on because of how interesting and unique the samurai were. We are going to discuss some interesting characteristics of the samurai, and at the end of this article we will show you how to add a piece of the samurai spirit to your daily life. Before we go any further into the details of a Samurai Warrior, here is a very quick crash course on the Samurai…

Samurai Quick Reference Guide:

1. The term samurai originally meant “those who serve in close attendance to nobility”
2. The samurai were members of a powerful military caste in feudal Japan in the 12th century.
3. Samurai were servants to the most powerful political and social men of the era.
4. As servants of the great lords, the samurai backed up the authority of the shogun and gave him power over the emperor.
5. The samurai loyally protected their masters as well as enforced their orders.
6. The samurai were bound by a code of honor, discipline and morality known as Bushido or “The Way of the Warrior.”
7. If a samurai violated this code of honor (or was captured in battle), a gruesome ritual suicide was the chosen method of punishment and atonement.
8. The ritual suicide of a samurai or Seppuku can be either a voluntary act or a punishment.
9. Either way the ritual suicide of a samurai is generally seen as an extremely honorable way to die.
10. The samurai would dominate Japanese government and society until 1868.

There you have it, you now know just enough about Samurai’s to be dangerous in a conversation.

To sum it up even further, the samurai were highly trained, well equipped elite warriors whose weapons and tactics are still studied today.

What we are going to focus on next in this article is what the samurai warriors would use as their weapons of choice, and why they used them.

The Warrior Spirit

Samurai

Samurai, 1866. Photograph by Felice Beato

Japanese swords are the weapons that have come to be synonymous with the samurai. Samurai believed that their warrior spirit was contained within their swords. The sword was the weapon of choice for the samurai. The samurai sword has evolved over the centuries, starting from a straight blade and moving to a curved blade and then ultimately the katana was chosen.  The samurai also carried smaller companion swords known as the wakizashi and the tanto. Wearing a long sword (katana) or (tachi) together with a smaller sword such as a wakizashi or tanto became the symbol of the samurai, this combination of swords is referred to as a daisho (literally “big and small”).

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*Katana, Wakizashi, and Tanto on display

Samurai Weapons and Tactics Quick Reference

japanese-swords-types1

1. The Samurai were experts in a wide variety of combat skills including hand-to-hand combat, ground fighting, fighting with arms (swords, bows, spears) and fighting from horseback.
2. The elite Samurai warrior trained for many years in the art “Bujutsu.”
3. We are going to focus on the samurai’s weapon of choice, the sword.
4. The samurai’s swords were yet another important aspect of his life
5. Samurai often named their swords, in a dedication of devotion.
6.
Samurai believed that their warrior spirit was contained within their swords.
7. The samurai wore two swords, a wakizashi and a katana.
8.
The samurai’s katana was his primary weapon of self-defense
9. Samurai’s also carried a smaller wakizashi sword.
10.
The samurai often used his wakizashi in close quarter combat situations and even during ceremonial, ritual suicide if the warrior had broken one of the 7 virtues of bushido.
11. When worn with the Japanese katana, the pair (of katana and wakizashi) is then referred to as daisho.
12.
Their swords were made by master sword smiths and quality tested on the corpses of criminals.
13. The forging of a genuine Samurai sword is a tedious, labor-intensive process that begins with a specialized Japanese steel called “tamahagane.” Through this smelting process, a steel is produced that consists of a carbon count that is balanced throughout the steel making it the optimal steel for fashioning a sword. Master Swordsmiths then begin the process of folding the steel begins and can be folded up to 16 times. This process helps to remove any remaining impurities, while also creating alternating layers that greatly increase the toughness and durability of the blade.

14. The length of a Samurai sword has varied over time, but the modern version is typically around 40 inches overall with a 28 inch blade.

Japanese Sword Making

The Edge of Choice for the Samurai

We have now spent some time learning about who the samurai were, and also what kind of weapons they carried. We know that the samurai were a serious group of warriors who were highly skilled in weapons and tactics. We also know that they had a deep, almost spiritual, bond with their swords. We learned that making a samurai sword is an extremely labor intensive job that takes the hands of a master swordsmith. Knowing how serious the bond with their swords went, and also knowing what they used their swords for, one could suggest that the samurai would have wanted to possess the best, most capable sword available to them. For the most part, the samurai chose the tanto style blade as their blade of choice for their weapons. This was not a coincidence, this was a thought out strategic choice.

Body Armour of the Time

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Japanese samurai armor was typically made up of many small parts and a wide variety of materials. Steel, leather, and wood typically form the protective plating, which may be composed of many small sections laced together using leather or silk cord. Samurai armor was designed to be strong, protective, flexible and terrifying.

Being that the body armor being warn was very heavy duty, the samurai needed a weapon that would excel at piercing through tough materials. The tanto blade was the desired choice for Japanese long and short swords.

Characteristics of the Tanto Blade:

SamuraiTanto

The tanto blade has a high point with a flat grind, leading to an extremely strong point that is perfect for stabbing into hard materials. The thick point of the tanto blade contains a lot of metal near the tip, so it is able to absorb the impact from repeated piercing that would cause most other knives to break.

The front edge of the tanto blade meets the back edge at an angle, rather than a curve. As a result, the tanto blade does not have a belly, which is sacrificed in exchange for a stronger tip. However, it’s extremely strong point allows it to be used in tough situations where piercing hard materials is required.

Japanese-swords-samurai-swords-tanto-cold-steel
Japanese Tanto Knife

The Japanese tanto is a Japanese dagger carried by samurai. Specifically, the Japanese tanto is one with a guard that has all of the fittings used on swords. The Japanese tanto blade rarely exceeds 12 inches in length and usually accompanying a katana. The tanto is much more decorated and has unusual fittings than the larger swords. The Japanese tanto was designed primarily as a stabbing instrument, but the edge can be used to slash as well.

Become One with the Samurai…

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If the OTF knife existed back in days of the samurai, I would like to believe that they would have wanted to incorporate it into their war arsenal. Unfortunately that is something we will never actually know. What we do know is that the samurai preferred the tanto blade, and we at Raven Crest Tactical also favor the tanto blade as our preferred blade style. Here is why..

To be 100% honest, part of our love for the tanto is based on the aesthetic beauty of the tanto blade. The sharp curves and beveled edges give the blade a sleek, strong and aggressive look.

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Raven Crsst Tactical Non Serrated Tanto Blade

RCTTantoSerr
Raven Crest Tactical Serrated Tanto Blade

Don’t get us wrong, the tanto blade isn’t just a blade for the eyes. The tanto blade is extremely useful for cutting or penetrating tough materials, just ask the samurai. For our OTF knives we offer two variations on the tanto blade, serrated and non serrated. We could go on for days on which is the better option (serrated vs non-serrated), but that ultimately is decided by one’s personal preference.

Now, our OTF knives may not be forged in the fires by an ancient and wise knifesmith, nor is our knives sharpness tested on the corpses of dead criminals; but every one of our knives is hand assembled and hand sharpened using both modern and traditional tools and techniques. These key features not only place our OTF knives up with other elite knife makers, but it follows the traditional ways in which a samurai’s sword was made.

The fact of the matter is this, no matter which style of tanto blade you choose when you carry a Raven Crest Tactical tanto you are carrying with you a piece of the samurai warrior spirit.

Silent_samurai_mask

There is no way we could have written this article without a lot of help.. We thank all those who help contribute to this article.

References:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2WkWNDDrQO4#t=1347
http://listverse.com/2013/08/06/10-fascinating-facts-about-the-samurai/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samurai
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tant%C5%8D
http://www.trueswords.com/samurai_history.php
http://getasword.com/blog/125-japanese-sword-types-katana-tachi-wakizashi-nodachi/
https://yokaihigh.files.wordpress.com/2014/01/japanese_weapons-wide.jpg

OTF Knife Care and Maintenance : Taking Apart and Cleaning your OTF Knife

Cleaning and caring for your OTF knife is a very important part of owning one. A clean and well maintained OTF is a functional and useful tool. A dirty OTF knife can misfire and be unreliable. The good news is that cleaning and caring for an OTF can be very easy and fun. Now, before we go any further we must put this little disclaimer out there:

“We understand that OTF knives come in all different shapes and sizes. So, when discussing the caring for and cleaning of your OTF we are going to assume that you own one of our fantastic knives.”

If you don’t own one of our OTF knives then I would really recommend getting one.. They are awesome and we guarantee your satisfaction…

But seriously if you own another brand I highly recommend reading their warranty details to make sure that opening up your knife doesn’t void the warranty. Now, if you are allowed to open up your knife without voiding the warranty I recommend going to YouTube and doing a search for “cleaning and caring for a (“enter your knife name here”)”. Chances are someone out there made a video showing you how to properly clean your knife. If you do own a knife that has a stipulation against opening it, I recommend contacting that manufacturer to find out how they recommend caring for their product.

BASIC STEPS TO CARING FOR YOUR OTF KNIFE:

1. Discharge your Knife: This step was not in our video, but we highly recommend performing this step before opening up your knife. To discharge your knife simply fire it at close range against something that is not human, animal, or valuable. We recommend a phone book or even a piece of paper will do the job. Once fired at close range, the blade should discharge from it’s mechanism and slide freely in and out of the handle. If the knife has been properly discharged, the trigger will not eject or retract the blade.

2. Prepare your Tools: To properly open and clean your OTF knife you are going to need a few items. First, you will need a 2 mm metric or 5/64th standard bit. Then you will also need a light lubricant and a rag.

3. Open the Knife: Use your desired bit to unscrew the 6 screws that hold the handle together.

4. Remove the Inside Components: Once the screws are removed, it is time to disassemble the knife and separate the individual components. The main internal components are the slider, the main spring, and the blade. For this step just worry about getting the handle separated as well as separating the spring and slider so that they can be cleaned.

5. Remove the Blade: The easiest way to explain this is to watch the video attached to this post.

6. Clean all Parts: We have tried many different kinds of light lubricants, and the one that seems to work out the best for us is the WD-40 rust proof spray as seen in our video. If you have a light lubricant that you would prefer please feel free to use it. If the lubricant is too thick it is going to restrict the blade path and keep the knife from firing properly. If this is the case simply re-clean all components and either use no lubricant, or try a different type of lubricant that will not restrict the blade path. And if that still doesn’t work, give us a call and we will get your knife back to working order.

7. Reassemble and Enjoy your OTF: Go there and hunt bears, cut cheese, save damsels in distress or whatever it is that you use your Ravencrest Tactical OTF Knife for. Just do it safely and in good health!

We hope that this article has been useful (and hopefully somewhat amusing). If it has been, we ask you to please share it somewhere.

Next week we are going to go over how to properly sharpen and maintain the edge of your blade. Stay tuned….

OTF Knife State Laws and Legalities

OTF Knife State Laws:

MYTH: Switchblades / OTF Knives and Balisongs (butterfly knives) are illegal everywhere without exception

Not true. Most laws about non-firearm weapons are by state, with very few existing at the Federal level. Currently, the only country-wide law about switchblades is US Code Title 15, Chapter 29, and this law only controls the importation of these knives into the US, and the sale over state lines. It has no effects on buying, owning or carrying switchblades. Such is left to the states. The majority of states allow legal ownership of switchblades, but a few do not. Many have prohibitions on the sale of them, and most have laws against carrying them concealed. But some states such as Vermont and Utah have no restrictions on them.

 US Switchblade / OTF Knife Laws

The following is a comprehensive compilation of the laws on switchblades (also called automatics or OTF Knives) in the United States. This chart covers both overall federal law and each state law. These laws are for non-law enforcement citizens, as nearly all laws contain some sort of exemption for police. In states where unlawful intent must be proven (and is not simply presumed) for the knife to be illegal, this chart counts this as “legal.”

Legend:

Possession = Refers to the legality of merely owning or having direct control over a switchblade, even if kept at home. Sale = The legality of merchants and private citizens offering switchblades for sale or selling them. Usually includes any transfer of ownership, even gifts. Note that such laws almost always only affect the seller; no state law affects the buyer of such a transaction. Open Carry = legality of carrying a switchblade unconcealed and in plain view of others. Concealed Carry = legality of carrying a switchblade in a concealed manner on one’s person(or most of the time, in a car). Balisong considered same thing? = Refers to if the wording of the law considers switchblades and balisongs to be the same thing. If “Yes,” balisongs are subject to all the same restrictions as switchblades listed for that state. If “no” they are covered by a separate law and may or may not be legal. Blanks indicate the state has no laws about either.

Practical Matters

If possession itself is illegal, then all others become illegal by default. If possession is legal, but sale is not, it effectively becomes impossible to legally obtain a switchblade from within that state (since federal law prohibits inter-state sale). One must physically travel to another state to legally purchase.

OTF_Knife_Legal_States_Map_2015

State

Possession

Sale

Open Carry

Concealed Carry

Balisong considered same thing?

US Federal Law

Legal

Illegal when sold over state lines or imported from outside the US

Legal

Legal

Yes

Alabama

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Alaska

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Arizona

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if over 21 years old

Arkansas

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

California

Legal

Legal if blade is <2″

Legal if blade is <2″

Legal if blade is <2″

Yes

Colorado

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Connecticut

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤1.5″

Legal if blade is ≤1.5″

No

Delaware

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

District of Columbia

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Florida

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal (Legal with gun permit)

N/A

Georgia

Legal

Legal (if over 18)

Legal if blade is ≤5″ (any length with gun permit)

Legal if blade is ≤5″ (any length with gun permit)

Hawaii

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Idaho

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤4″

No

Illinois

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Indiana

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

Iowa

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤5″

No

Kansas

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Kentucky

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Louisiana

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Maine

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

Maryland

Legal

Illegal

Legal

Illegal

No

Massachusetts

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Michigan

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Minnesota

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Mississippi

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

Missouri

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Yes

Montana

Illegal (ex. Curio or blade is ≤1.5″)

Illegal (ex. Curio or blade is ≤1.5″)

Illegal

Illegal

No

Nebraska

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤3.5″

Nevada

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

New Hampshire

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

New Jersey

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

New Mexico

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

New York

Illegal*

Illegal*

Illegal*

Illegal*

No

North Carolina

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

North Dakota

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Ohio

Legal

Illegal

Legal

Illegal

No

Oklahoma

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

Oregon

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Yes

Pennsylvania

Illegal (ex. Curio)

Illegal (ex. Curio)

Illegal

Illegal

No

Rhode Island

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤3″

No

South Carolina

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

South Dakota

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Tennessee

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

Texas

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is <5.5″

Legal if blade is <5.5″

Yes

Utah

Legal

Legal

Legal

Situational

Yes

Vermont

Legal

Legal if blade is <3″

Legal

Legal

No

Virginia

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Washington

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

West Virginia

Legal (if over 18)

Legal

Legal (if over 18)

Illegal

No

Wisconsin

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

Wyoming

Legal

Legal

Legal

Situational

*New York’s state law provides an exception for “Possession of a switchblade or gravity knife for use while hunting, trapping or fishing by a person carrying a valid license.” Whether this affects sale or type of carry is unclear.

**Information cited from: “http://weaponlaws.wikidot.com/us-switchblade-laws”

OTF Knife Buyers Guide

The Best OTF Knife Is The One That’s In Your Pocket

There is no magic formula when it comes to making a decision about purchasing a OTF knife. There are so many OTF knives on the market today. Many are great products from trusted companies. So how do you know whats right for you? There are a couple of principles we here at Raven Crest Tactical believe you should follow when picking out your next trusted OTF knife..

What Will You Be Using Your OTF Knife For?

When it comes to picking out any new OTF knife you need to think about the purpose for which you intend to use the OTF knife. Will it be something to add to the collection or will it remain in the glove box of your car in case of emergencies? Will it ride along in your tool box at work or in your hunting bag? Will it be used for self defense or a utility blade for every day tasks? You must first understand its function before you can decide on which knife is the right knife for you. Once you have a good idea how you will be using the OTF knife, you can move onto the style of the OTF knife.

Blade Sizes

Blade size considerations

Though usually a matter of personal preference, blade size should be determined by the job for which it is intended and the way you plan to carry your knife. Typically, larger blades are used for outdoor and other heavy-duty applications, while smaller blades are appropriate for everyday tasks. Note: Prior to purchasing a knife, it is a good practice to check the laws in your state or country regarding legal blade sizes and lengths.

Edge Types

Straight

Titan Bravo Tactical OTF Knife Straight Blade

Titan Bravo Tactical OTF Knife Straight Blade

Straight Edge blades are the standard for general knives and cutlery. The ideal choice for hunting, the Straight Edge provides an edge that cuts cleanly and sharpens quickly and easily.

Fully Serrated

Fully Serrated Blade

Fully Serrated Blade

Fully Serrated blades remarkably outperform straight edges when cutting fibrous material, like rope. It is an aggressive edge and often leaves a ragged cut. Serrations typically will stay sharp longer than a straight edge but once dull, are much more difficult to sharpen. However, there are many systems today that make sharpening serrations easier.

Partially Serrated

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Partially Serrated Blade

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Partially Serrated Blade

Partially Serrated blades offer the advantages of both straight and serrated edges in one knife blade. A partially serrated edge is a good compromise when the blade will be used for general purposes.

Blade Shapes

Tanto

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Tanto Blade

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Tanto Blade

Tanto has become identifiable for its angular shape, using two straight edges that are joined. The Tanto tip is very strong due to the spine keeping its full width until it nears the tip, which then tapers to create the point. The Raven Crest Tactical Nemesis OTF Knife is an example of a Tanto blade.

Drop Point

Titan Tactical OTF Knife with Drop Point Blade

Titan Tactical OTF Knife with Drop Point Blade

Drop Point is a pattern used on many knives, commonly seen on hunting blades. The tip is lowered (dropped) via a convex arc from the spine to allow the tip to be ground thicker. This convex shape differentiates it from the clip point. The Raven Crest Tactical Titan Bravo is a good example of this style.

Clip Point

Jackal Tactical OTF Knife with Clip Point Blade

Jackal Tactical OTF Knife with Clip Point Blade

Clip Point is a great all-around format and one of the most popular, used on most bowie knives. The blade shape uses a concave or straight cutout toward the tip. The Raven Crest Tactical Jackal Alpha is a fine example of a clip point.

Spear Point

Zombie Hunter Tactical OTF Knife with Spear Point Blade

Zombie Hunter Tactical OTF Knife with Spear Point Blade

Spear Point is a symmetrical grind with the tip located at the blade’s center. Double-edged, the spear point shape makes for a great dagger. The Raven Crest Tactical Venom Bravo is an example of a spear point blade style.

Steel Properties

There is a saying: The heart of a knife is its steel. While steel certainly is very important, it is not the only factor in determining the performance of a knife (other considerations being heat treatment and blade shape/profile). The level of steel quality varies greatly from knife to knife. Most modern knives, however, are made using stainless steel (a steel alloy with a minimum of 11% chromium content by mass). By varying the amount of chromium and carbon in the makeup of the steel, different properties are achieved.

Some basic information on steel grades and characteristics:

Good

These entry-level, rust-resistant stainless steels are typically made in Asia and offer good value. Compared to higher grades, they tend to be softer and require more frequent sharpening to maintain the best performance, but do adequately hold an edge. EXAMPLES: 420, 440A, 7CR13MOV

Better

Better grade stainless steels contain higher chromium content, making them more expensive. With greater edge holding ability, these steels require less maintenance than entry-level grades of steel. Sharpening is also relatively easy and can be performed using appropriate techniques. A great combination of value and performance, knives made of these steels are perfect for everyday use. EXAMPLES: AUS6, AUS8, 440C, 8CR13MOV

Best

Typically made in the USA and Japan, the best stainless steels come with a cost premium, due to their high chromium content. Additional elements, such as vanadium, are often added to provide superior edge sharpness and retention, as well as enhanced rust resistance. These steels are ideal for more demanding uses. EXAMPLES: CPM 154, S30V, VG-10

AUS-8 and AUS-6 are high-grade chromium Japanese steels that boast a good balance of toughness and strength, edge holding ability, corrosion resistance, and cost. Typical Rockwell hardness is 56-58.

440A and 440C are high-grade cutlery steels that are very similar to AUS above. The 440A contains the least amount of carbon and is more stain-resistant than 440C, which contains the most carbon and is typically harder. Many knives are made of 440 stainless, due to its toughness and relatively low cost.

VG-10 is a well-known, high-end Japanese steel, and is considered premium. It contains vanadium, which is renown for its toughness. The steel is specially designed for high-quality blades used in cutlery. VG-10 can be sharpened to a fine edge that is very durable and can maintain a hardness of Rc 60 without becoming brittle.

CPM S30V is a powder-made stainless steel developed by Crucible Materials Corporation for its wear and corrosion resistance. Considered to be one of the superior steels ever made, its chemistry promotes the formation and even distribution of vanadium carbides, which are harder and more effective at cutting than chromium carbides. In addition, vanadium carbides give the steel a very refined grain, which further contributes to the sharpness and toughness of its edge.

154CM is an American-made premium grade stainless steel, originally developed for tough industrial applications. It combines three principal elements: carbon, chromium, and molybdenum. Known for its best all-around qualities, it offers great corrosion resistance with good toughness and edge quality. Typical Rockwell hardness is 57-59.

D2 is a high-performance tool steel alloy commonly used in knives and tools. It is not considered stainless steel, as its chromium content is one percent less than the required classification.

8Cr13MoV is a Chinese stainless steel with a high performance-to-cost ratio, often compared to AUS-8. Tempered around the Rc56 to Rc58 range.