Latest Blog Posts

Happy Halloween To Our Awesome Customers & Fans! We Made You All A “Cheesy” Short Halloween Film…

Happy Halloween from Raven Crest Tactical! Instead of just doing a simple Facebook post this year we decided to try our hand at making a “cheesy” Halloween short film. We did this with VERY LIMITED equipment but had a great time making this for you all. We hope you enjoy! Have a safe, fun and memorable Halloween.


Movie Synopsis:
A college couple decides to have a date night at home just hanging out watching a movie and having popcorn. As they get settled in things start to go bump in the night by the hand of a “psycho” who likes to play games. Our college sweethearts try to track down the source of this craziness but are always one step behind. They soon make the mistake of assuming it was “just nothing” and are soon corrected. In the end the Raven Crest Tactical Nemesis OTF Knife was all that was needed to stop the madness.

Filmed in the style of Blair witch project and other blurry shaky type movies. 😉

OTF Knife Care and Maintenance : Taking Apart and Cleaning your OTF Knife

Cleaning and caring for your OTF knife is a very important part of owning one. A clean and well maintained OTF is a functional and useful tool. A dirty OTF knife can misfire and be unreliable. The good news is that cleaning and caring for an OTF can be very easy and fun. Now, before we go any further we must put this little disclaimer out there:

“We understand that OTF knives come in all different shapes and sizes. So, when discussing the caring for and cleaning of your OTF we are going to assume that you own one of our fantastic knives.”

If you don’t own one of our OTF knives then I would really recommend getting one.. They are awesome and we guarantee your satisfaction…

But seriously if you own another brand I highly recommend reading their warranty details to make sure that opening up your knife doesn’t void the warranty. Now, if you are allowed to open up your knife without voiding the warranty I recommend going to YouTube and doing a search for “cleaning and caring for a (“enter your knife name here”)”. Chances are someone out there made a video showing you how to properly clean your knife. If you do own a knife that has a stipulation against opening it, I recommend contacting that manufacturer to find out how they recommend caring for their product.

BASIC STEPS TO CARING FOR YOUR OTF KNIFE:

1. Discharge your Knife: This step was not in our video, but we highly recommend performing this step before opening up your knife. To discharge your knife simply fire it at close range against something that is not human, animal, or valuable. We recommend a phone book or even a piece of paper will do the job. Once fired at close range, the blade should discharge from it’s mechanism and slide freely in and out of the handle. If the knife has been properly discharged, the trigger will not eject or retract the blade.

2. Prepare your Tools: To properly open and clean your OTF knife you are going to need a few items. First, you will need a 2 mm metric or 5/64th standard bit. Then you will also need a light lubricant and a rag.

3. Open the Knife: Use your desired bit to unscrew the 6 screws that hold the handle together.

4. Remove the Inside Components: Once the screws are removed, it is time to disassemble the knife and separate the individual components. The main internal components are the slider, the main spring, and the blade. For this step just worry about getting the handle separated as well as separating the spring and slider so that they can be cleaned.

5. Remove the Blade: The easiest way to explain this is to watch the video attached to this post.

6. Clean all Parts: We have tried many different kinds of light lubricants, and the one that seems to work out the best for us is the WD-40 rust proof spray as seen in our video. If you have a light lubricant that you would prefer please feel free to use it. If the lubricant is too thick it is going to restrict the blade path and keep the knife from firing properly. If this is the case simply re-clean all components and either use no lubricant, or try a different type of lubricant that will not restrict the blade path. And if that still doesn’t work, give us a call and we will get your knife back to working order.

7. Reassemble and Enjoy your OTF: Go there and hunt bears, cut cheese, save damsels in distress or whatever it is that you use your Ravencrest Tactical OTF Knife for. Just do it safely and in good health!

We hope that this article has been useful (and hopefully somewhat amusing). If it has been, we ask you to please share it somewhere.

Next week we are going to go over how to properly sharpen and maintain the edge of your blade. Stay tuned….

OTF Knife State Laws and Legalities

OTF Knife State Laws:

MYTH: Switchblades / OTF Knives and Balisongs (butterfly knives) are illegal everywhere without exception

Not true. Most laws about non-firearm weapons are by state, with very few existing at the Federal level. Currently, the only country-wide law about switchblades is US Code Title 15, Chapter 29, and this law only controls the importation of these knives into the US, and the sale over state lines. It has no effects on buying, owning or carrying switchblades. Such is left to the states. The majority of states allow legal ownership of switchblades, but a few do not. Many have prohibitions on the sale of them, and most have laws against carrying them concealed. But some states such as Vermont and Utah have no restrictions on them.

 US Switchblade / OTF Knife Laws

The following is a comprehensive compilation of the laws on switchblades (also called automatics or OTF Knives) in the United States. This chart covers both overall federal law and each state law. These laws are for non-law enforcement citizens, as nearly all laws contain some sort of exemption for police. In states where unlawful intent must be proven (and is not simply presumed) for the knife to be illegal, this chart counts this as “legal.”

Legend:

Possession = Refers to the legality of merely owning or having direct control over a switchblade, even if kept at home. Sale = The legality of merchants and private citizens offering switchblades for sale or selling them. Usually includes any transfer of ownership, even gifts. Note that such laws almost always only affect the seller; no state law affects the buyer of such a transaction. Open Carry = legality of carrying a switchblade unconcealed and in plain view of others. Concealed Carry = legality of carrying a switchblade in a concealed manner on one’s person(or most of the time, in a car). Balisong considered same thing? = Refers to if the wording of the law considers switchblades and balisongs to be the same thing. If “Yes,” balisongs are subject to all the same restrictions as switchblades listed for that state. If “no” they are covered by a separate law and may or may not be legal. Blanks indicate the state has no laws about either.

Practical Matters

If possession itself is illegal, then all others become illegal by default. If possession is legal, but sale is not, it effectively becomes impossible to legally obtain a switchblade from within that state (since federal law prohibits inter-state sale). One must physically travel to another state to legally purchase.

OTF_Knife_Legal_States_Map_2015

State

Possession

Sale

Open Carry

Concealed Carry

Balisong considered same thing?

US Federal Law

Legal

Illegal when sold over state lines or imported from outside the US

Legal

Legal

Yes

Alabama

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Alaska

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Arizona

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if over 21 years old

Arkansas

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

California

Legal

Legal if blade is <2″

Legal if blade is <2″

Legal if blade is <2″

Yes

Colorado

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Connecticut

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤1.5″

Legal if blade is ≤1.5″

No

Delaware

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

District of Columbia

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Florida

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal (Legal with gun permit)

N/A

Georgia

Legal

Legal (if over 18)

Legal if blade is ≤5″ (any length with gun permit)

Legal if blade is ≤5″ (any length with gun permit)

Hawaii

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Idaho

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤4″

No

Illinois

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Indiana

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

Iowa

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤5″

No

Kansas

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Kentucky

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Louisiana

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Maine

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

Maryland

Legal

Illegal

Legal

Illegal

No

Massachusetts

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Michigan

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Minnesota

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Mississippi

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

Missouri

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Yes

Montana

Illegal (ex. Curio or blade is ≤1.5″)

Illegal (ex. Curio or blade is ≤1.5″)

Illegal

Illegal

No

Nebraska

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤3.5″

Nevada

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

New Hampshire

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

New Jersey

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

New Mexico

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

New York

Illegal*

Illegal*

Illegal*

Illegal*

No

North Carolina

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

North Dakota

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Ohio

Legal

Illegal

Legal

Illegal

No

Oklahoma

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

No

Oregon

Legal

Legal

Legal

Illegal

Yes

Pennsylvania

Illegal (ex. Curio)

Illegal (ex. Curio)

Illegal

Illegal

No

Rhode Island

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is ≤3″

No

South Carolina

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

South Dakota

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

Tennessee

Legal

Legal

Legal

Legal

No

Texas

Legal

Legal

Legal if blade is <5.5″

Legal if blade is <5.5″

Yes

Utah

Legal

Legal

Legal

Situational

Yes

Vermont

Legal

Legal if blade is <3″

Legal

Legal

No

Virginia

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

Washington

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

No

West Virginia

Legal (if over 18)

Legal

Legal (if over 18)

Illegal

No

Wisconsin

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Illegal

Yes

Wyoming

Legal

Legal

Legal

Situational

*New York’s state law provides an exception for “Possession of a switchblade or gravity knife for use while hunting, trapping or fishing by a person carrying a valid license.” Whether this affects sale or type of carry is unclear.

**Information cited from: “http://weaponlaws.wikidot.com/us-switchblade-laws”

OTF Knife Buyers Guide

The Best OTF Knife Is The One That’s In Your Pocket

There is no magic formula when it comes to making a decision about purchasing a OTF knife. There are so many OTF knives on the market today. Many are great products from trusted companies. So how do you know whats right for you? There are a couple of principles we here at Raven Crest Tactical believe you should follow when picking out your next trusted OTF knife..

What Will You Be Using Your OTF Knife For?

When it comes to picking out any new OTF knife you need to think about the purpose for which you intend to use the OTF knife. Will it be something to add to the collection or will it remain in the glove box of your car in case of emergencies? Will it ride along in your tool box at work or in your hunting bag? Will it be used for self defense or a utility blade for every day tasks? You must first understand its function before you can decide on which knife is the right knife for you. Once you have a good idea how you will be using the OTF knife, you can move onto the style of the OTF knife.

Blade Sizes

Blade size considerations

Though usually a matter of personal preference, blade size should be determined by the job for which it is intended and the way you plan to carry your knife. Typically, larger blades are used for outdoor and other heavy-duty applications, while smaller blades are appropriate for everyday tasks. Note: Prior to purchasing a knife, it is a good practice to check the laws in your state or country regarding legal blade sizes and lengths.

Edge Types

Straight

Titan Bravo Tactical OTF Knife Straight Blade

Titan Bravo Tactical OTF Knife Straight Blade

Straight Edge blades are the standard for general knives and cutlery. The ideal choice for hunting, the Straight Edge provides an edge that cuts cleanly and sharpens quickly and easily.

Fully Serrated

Fully Serrated Blade

Fully Serrated Blade

Fully Serrated blades remarkably outperform straight edges when cutting fibrous material, like rope. It is an aggressive edge and often leaves a ragged cut. Serrations typically will stay sharp longer than a straight edge but once dull, are much more difficult to sharpen. However, there are many systems today that make sharpening serrations easier.

Partially Serrated

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Partially Serrated Blade

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Partially Serrated Blade

Partially Serrated blades offer the advantages of both straight and serrated edges in one knife blade. A partially serrated edge is a good compromise when the blade will be used for general purposes.

Blade Shapes

Tanto

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Tanto Blade

Nemesis Tactical OTF Knife with Tanto Blade

Tanto has become identifiable for its angular shape, using two straight edges that are joined. The Tanto tip is very strong due to the spine keeping its full width until it nears the tip, which then tapers to create the point. The Raven Crest Tactical Nemesis OTF Knife is an example of a Tanto blade.

Drop Point

Titan Tactical OTF Knife with Drop Point Blade

Titan Tactical OTF Knife with Drop Point Blade

Drop Point is a pattern used on many knives, commonly seen on hunting blades. The tip is lowered (dropped) via a convex arc from the spine to allow the tip to be ground thicker. This convex shape differentiates it from the clip point. The Raven Crest Tactical Titan Bravo is a good example of this style.

Clip Point

Jackal Tactical OTF Knife with Clip Point Blade

Jackal Tactical OTF Knife with Clip Point Blade

Clip Point is a great all-around format and one of the most popular, used on most bowie knives. The blade shape uses a concave or straight cutout toward the tip. The Raven Crest Tactical Jackal Alpha is a fine example of a clip point.

Spear Point

Zombie Hunter Tactical OTF Knife with Spear Point Blade

Zombie Hunter Tactical OTF Knife with Spear Point Blade

Spear Point is a symmetrical grind with the tip located at the blade’s center. Double-edged, the spear point shape makes for a great dagger. The Raven Crest Tactical Venom Bravo is an example of a spear point blade style.

Steel Properties

There is a saying: The heart of a knife is its steel. While steel certainly is very important, it is not the only factor in determining the performance of a knife (other considerations being heat treatment and blade shape/profile). The level of steel quality varies greatly from knife to knife. Most modern knives, however, are made using stainless steel (a steel alloy with a minimum of 11% chromium content by mass). By varying the amount of chromium and carbon in the makeup of the steel, different properties are achieved.

Some basic information on steel grades and characteristics:

Good

These entry-level, rust-resistant stainless steels are typically made in Asia and offer good value. Compared to higher grades, they tend to be softer and require more frequent sharpening to maintain the best performance, but do adequately hold an edge. EXAMPLES: 420, 440A, 7CR13MOV

Better

Better grade stainless steels contain higher chromium content, making them more expensive. With greater edge holding ability, these steels require less maintenance than entry-level grades of steel. Sharpening is also relatively easy and can be performed using appropriate techniques. A great combination of value and performance, knives made of these steels are perfect for everyday use. EXAMPLES: AUS6, AUS8, 440C, 8CR13MOV

Best

Typically made in the USA and Japan, the best stainless steels come with a cost premium, due to their high chromium content. Additional elements, such as vanadium, are often added to provide superior edge sharpness and retention, as well as enhanced rust resistance. These steels are ideal for more demanding uses. EXAMPLES: CPM 154, S30V, VG-10

AUS-8 and AUS-6 are high-grade chromium Japanese steels that boast a good balance of toughness and strength, edge holding ability, corrosion resistance, and cost. Typical Rockwell hardness is 56-58.

440A and 440C are high-grade cutlery steels that are very similar to AUS above. The 440A contains the least amount of carbon and is more stain-resistant than 440C, which contains the most carbon and is typically harder. Many knives are made of 440 stainless, due to its toughness and relatively low cost.

VG-10 is a well-known, high-end Japanese steel, and is considered premium. It contains vanadium, which is renown for its toughness. The steel is specially designed for high-quality blades used in cutlery. VG-10 can be sharpened to a fine edge that is very durable and can maintain a hardness of Rc 60 without becoming brittle.

CPM S30V is a powder-made stainless steel developed by Crucible Materials Corporation for its wear and corrosion resistance. Considered to be one of the superior steels ever made, its chemistry promotes the formation and even distribution of vanadium carbides, which are harder and more effective at cutting than chromium carbides. In addition, vanadium carbides give the steel a very refined grain, which further contributes to the sharpness and toughness of its edge.

154CM is an American-made premium grade stainless steel, originally developed for tough industrial applications. It combines three principal elements: carbon, chromium, and molybdenum. Known for its best all-around qualities, it offers great corrosion resistance with good toughness and edge quality. Typical Rockwell hardness is 57-59.

D2 is a high-performance tool steel alloy commonly used in knives and tools. It is not considered stainless steel, as its chromium content is one percent less than the required classification.

8Cr13MoV is a Chinese stainless steel with a high performance-to-cost ratio, often compared to AUS-8. Tempered around the Rc56 to Rc58 range.

Lost In The Woods

Most Tactical Man (Parody)

*We hope you find a good laugh in this. It was just for fun!

So you find yourself lost in the woods.

This reminds me of what my Pappi use to say when this happened to me. His rich advice still guides me to today. He would look me straight in the eye, and say “Don’t get lost dip sh#$!” Those words still bring tears to my eyes today. Getting lost in the woods takes me back to my childhood days. As a child of eight my father would often times take me to the woods for a fun filled day of my favorite game called “Ditch me, in hopes I don’t find my way home”. Hahaha what great times. Over the years I have developed a system of survival I have labeled and have copyrights to the name of this system. I deemed these skills and named them “Survival Skills”. If anyone uses this phrase, I get a nickel for each infraction.

Today we discuss Using your knife and paracord to survive.

Depending on the situation, some of the first things you’ll probably need to accomplish r find water, starting a fire, and getting food. I of course can start fire with my skills using only dental floss and water, but normal people will need that handy paracord bracelet from rct. Get yourself some dry kindling (my dad said that was Portuguese for a beer, later I found out that when mom said get some kindling for dad she meant dried wood dry grass not a cold one).
Now, find a good spot for your fire, probably not under a tree or in a bear’s nest. Put your grass in a small pile so it looks like a nest (birds nest, not bear nest). Using the flint on your amazing RCT paracord bracelet make some sparks (if I have to explain how to do this, you probably going to die in the wilderness anyways.) When the grass gets a little ember in there start to lightly blow. Once you got a small flame I like to throw a duraflame log on it. Those things last for hours out there in the wilderness.
Now that we have fire, we need some drinks. I usually do a rain dance, but your probably untrained and need a more conventional method. What I suggest is you don’t go out in the wilderness without water. If you did, well read a book. I think all books will tell you not to do that. But if you find yourself without water, well that sucks to be you. If you have no water right now and are reading this, since it’s online I would probably just email someone to bring me some water. Other things you can try is, locate a circle k, u can usually find a great water source there. Also if you can find an Ihop, or a drinking fountain, these r great places to find water. Sometimes in the wilderness I will find a green hose, if you follow this little rainbow, at the end you will find a knob. Turning this knob usually provides water.

So we have a Duraflame fire, and water, we need some food. At this point I take out my trusty nemesis. I get a large spear looking stick. I begin to shave down the end of the stick until it comes to a point. I find an old willow tree and using my nemesis I poke the knife into the sweet spot. Out comes a black nectar. Using this nectar, I mix it with some chargrass roots, thistle thorn oil, and a bear claw (find this in the bear nest). Using three round rocks I grind into a powder. I take this powder and throw it over my left shoulder for good luck. I now use the pointed end of the spear to pierce threw the Carls Jr hamburgers I brought. I make extra care not to disrupt the tomato patterns created by the food artist known as Steven. I now eat. I have had some readers say, what if you don’t have a hamburger. My point is, well then don’t get lost in the woods and read a book. Don’t whine because you aren’t prepared.

I hope this was helpful, and as my dad always said “What the hell you doing!”.

Have a great day